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M Eversberg II

Physics guns and puzzles

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Not sure if it's wise throwing this idea out to the public and all, but I was wondering what other people things. As far as I know, in a FPS type of game, the "bullet" is a ray cast from the model of the gun that has a forumla to calculate when and where it hits. Since I've just begun to learn how to model, and I've played physics games and all before, I was thinking this: Would it be possable to create a model of a weapon (say a pistol), that has a magazine as a seperate model, and within these magazines there are a number of other models that are bullets? Within these bullets are some sort of trigger that actually simulates the explosion of powder -- using a physics model to fling the bullet along a correct path? M.

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Original post by M Eversberg II
Would it be possable to create a model of a weapon (say a pistol), that has a magazine as a seperate model, and within these magazines there are a number of other models that are bullets? Within these bullets are some sort of trigger that actually simulates the explosion of powder -- using a physics model to fling the bullet along a correct path?
It's possible; just a matter of alignment and making all the pieces fit together without looking horrendous. I believe Medal of Honor (one of the more recent expansions) has this sort of animation; you can actually watch soldiers as they replace the magazine, which also shows bullet shells flinging out of the barrel when they fire. Maybe I'm thinking of the recent Ghost Recon or Rainbow Six. Your idea may be slightly different than this, but it's definitely doable.

I wish I could provide a resource on this to get you started, but I don't think I've ever come across anything documenting such work. Another poster may be more helpful.

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Well what I posted was more than just an animation -- instead of getting hit by a "ray" which may or may not have a bullet graphic, you're actually flinging a model of a bullet and physically striking your target with it, like in HL2 when you throw stuff at people.

M.

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Well what I posted was more than just an animation -- instead of getting hit by a "ray" which may or may not have a bullet graphic, you're actually flinging a model of a bullet and physically striking your target with it, like in HL2 when you throw stuff at people.

It can be done, and I believe it has (although I can't remember where), but it usually isn't worth it. Ah, now I remember: Max Payne, the 'bullet time' slow down requires real bullets, otherwise you would not be able to watch them crawl slowly past your shoulder :)
For most games though, the ray cast is much simpler and requires less processing power, and animating the spent shell-casings gives plenty of realism.
Edit: And 007: NightFire. Or pretty much anygame with a bullet time tiype slo-mo action dynamic.

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If you mean simulating the flight path of the bullet, it's been done plenty. And if it hasn't, then I'm a friggin genius. If you are talking about simulating the unseen minutia of a gun being fired, it probably hasn't been done in any practical setting; if the player can't appreciate it, then what's the point?

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I think I know what you are talking about Eversberg, and if this is the case, no I do not believe that this has been done as it would require a signifigant increase in processing power for each bullet fired. Things like bullet mass, yaw, drag, momentum, bullet deformation, material it is striking (human tissue, Kevlar, steel, etc.) and so on would all have to be considered. I did a few quick searches and came up with a few sites you may want to look at (If this is the type of thing you are talking about.


Kinetic Pulse of bullets.
For body armor impact.
Breif on wound ballistics.
And penetrating trauma.

For the actual explosion of the powder in the bullet to create the propultion, forget it, that is what ballistics is for, to know the outcome of the bullet leaving the muzzle, with this you can still treat is as a projectile (opposed to a ray) but do not need to concern yourself with the unneeded info of why the bullet left the gun that way.

Hope they help, but know what you are getting into. You would need extensive documents about ballistics, forensics, and the like to create a truely realistic model for bullets and their impact with different mediums.

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I think I know what you are talking about Eversberg, and if this is the case, no I do not believe that this has been done as it would require a signifigant increase in processing power for each bullet fired. Things like bullet mass, yaw, drag, momentum, bullet deformation, material it is striking (human tissue, Kevlar, steel, etc.) and so on would all have to be considered. I did a few quick searches and came up with a few sites you may want to look at (If this is the type of thing you are talking about.


Kinetic Pulse of bullets.
For body armor impact.
Breif on wound ballistics.
And penetrating trauma.

For the actual explosion of the powder in the bullet to create the propultion, forget it, that is what ballistics is for, to know the outcome of the bullet leaving the muzzle, with this you can still treat is as a projectile (opposed to a ray) but do not need to concern yourself with the unneeded info of why the bullet left the gun that way.

Hope they help, but know what you are getting into. You would need extensive documents about ballistics, forensics, and the like to create a truely realistic model for bullets and their impact with different mediums.

While it might might be a fun project - and maybe they could use something like this in forensic reconstruction... but for games, I think the general response would be what's the point? It wouldn't increase the realism of your average FPS nearly as much as, for instance, more realistic character animation, and would require similar increases in computing power.

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