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Infinity99

Game Proramming Explanation needed

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I've gone everywhere asking about what exactly does a game programmer do. Nobody answers me. I've been trying to study programming to program my own game but to even start I need an experienced persons explanation.

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A game programmer writes source code in a programming language like C++, which is then compiled into code that the PC can understand (I.e. a .exe file). The For Beginners FAQ has a few links which should be relevant.

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I have DarkBASIC Pro. Does anyone know if that would be good for a beginner like me? I use Maya and it comes with a programmer called Python. Would this programmer be better? No replies are required but would be helpful.

[EDIT] Thanks for the link

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Original post by Infinity99
I have DarkBASIC Pro. Does anyone know if that would be good for a beginner like me? I use Maya and it comes with a programmer called Python. Would this programmer be better? No replies are required but would be helpful.
I've never used DarkBASIC, but I've heard it's good for beginners. Maya is modelling software which you can use to create assets for any games you create (Although I'm not sure how well DarkBASIC does 3D stuff).

As a sidenote:
A programmer is a person / job title ("I am a programmer")
A program is the software ("I wrote a program")

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I've seen a sample that came with the software and I don't think I'm gonna keep it long. Do you know anything about Python? And how do the models, worlds and such get transfered into the program. Like, do you convert them, put the files into the text. I don't understand how that whole process is gonna work.

(I'm sorry if I'm a nag)

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The concept of programming is, by using a programming language, you tell the computer what to do. The "compiler" is there to translate from a language that is understandable by people (programming languages like C++, Java, ..) to code that is understandable by the computer (for example an .exe file).

The files stay the same, most programming languages have commands for saying "read that file, and use it in this or that way".

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You're probably better off doing some 2D games if you're not yet familiar with all this - they're easier to create, which ups the chances of finishing some games, which in turn is more encouraging than failing (although that can be very educative).

Anyway. Art assets, whether they're models, textures, sounds, levels or whatever else, must be loaded into memory by the game before they can be used. Don't put them inside the code: you'd have to rebuild the game every time you change a level or model. Instead, save assets as files, and let the game load them when it needs them.
I'd strongly recommend using existing libraries to do so: for Python, there's PyGame, a framework that allows you to handle input and load and display images and sounds (if I'm not mistaken). Give it a try, follow some tutorials, and I'm sure you'll get a better understanding of it eventually.

Just a tip beforehand: if you've got 100 enemies, load in their image just once, and display it a 100 times (at different locations). That's probably the most common misconception I've seen so far. Good luck! :)

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Original post by Infinity99
I've seen a sample that came with the software and I don't think I'm gonna keep it long. Do you know anything about Python? And how do the models, worlds and such get transfered into the program. Like, do you convert them, put the files into the text. I don't understand how that whole process is gonna work.


Start here
Continue here

Once you have the tutorial covered, start thinking about the rest. Before you can write code by yourself you have no chance of understanding how to approach game development.

And anything 3D is very long way away.

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Thanks for you help everyone. I'm not a complete "noob". I was just asking before I got too deep into it when I could have done something else. Know what I mean?

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Hi bro! I am having a hard time getting on the field too! But well... I think I can advice you towards something I think is extremely nice...


C#/XNA. That is the stuff. Easy to get into and all... Plus tons of resources. I have no Python experience and DarkBASIC Pro isn't... My taste? BASIC means not so professional... :( I know, I know, but people! BASIC is no C++ equalevant.

XNA is the best suited for beginners, beginners that wants to create good stuff easy.

Let me recommend a course on C# and XNA, takes you from know nada to... Well... You will see the demos yourself of fellow students in the class :D. www.3dbuzz.com

Go for it!

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Original post by Mossa TheGreat
Hi bro! I am having a hard time getting on the field too! But well... I think I can advice you towards something I think is extremely nice...


C#/XNA. That is the stuff. Easy to get into and all... Plus tons of resources. I have no Python experience and DarkBASIC Pro isn't... My taste? BASIC means not so professional... :( I know, I know, but people! BASIC is no C++ equalevant.

XNA is the best suited for beginners, beginners that wants to create good stuff easy.

Let me recommend a course on C# and XNA, takes you from know nada to... Well... You will see the demos yourself of fellow students in the class :D. www.3dbuzz.com

Go for it!


Let me check these out.....What's C#. I know all about C++, Java and the others but I have never heard of C#. Wait, that's a new code, right? Some new program was supposed to be using it. I forgot what.

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Quote:
Original post by Infinity99
Quote:
Original post by Mossa TheGreat
Hi bro! I am having a hard time getting on the field too! But well... I think I can advice you towards something I think is extremely nice...


C#/XNA. That is the stuff. Easy to get into and all... Plus tons of resources. I have no Python experience and DarkBASIC Pro isn't... My taste? BASIC means not so professional... :( I know, I know, but people! BASIC is no C++ equalevant.

XNA is the best suited for beginners, beginners that wants to create good stuff easy.

Let me recommend a course on C# and XNA, takes you from know nada to... Well... You will see the demos yourself of fellow students in the class :D. www.3dbuzz.com

Go for it!


Let me check these out.....What's C#. I know all about C++, Java and the others but I have never heard of C#. Wait, that's a new code, right? Some new program was supposed to be using it. I forgot what.


C# is a programming language, pretty much like C++.. Only it is newer and much easier. C# is microsoft's way to combine (as best as possible) the power of C++ and the ease of higher level languages (such as Visual Basic or all the Basic stuff).
For a newbie programmer C# is a very good choice. Of course it does not compete with C++ when it comes to performance but really the choice of language is a matter of style most of the time. Whichever language you choose, stick to it and dont look back.

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Quote:
Original post by jpetrie
Quote:

Of course it does not compete with C++ when it comes to performance

Be advised, this is a misleading and dangerous assertion.


I knew someone would comment on this, and I also knew they would probably be right :P

i haven't written any application that was performance critical in C# (only a few windows apps and projects for uni) and so never had to test its performance to compare...
but personally, im not very enthusiastic to the whole concept of a CLR and intermediate languages, and the fact that you have to have a framework running and interpreting your code is a performance hit by itself.
I will provide a link i found a while ago of a page comparing all JIT compiled language performance and has very interesting results... anyway this is off-topic now but i just thought i should make my point clear because I agree on one point you: saying Language X is better than Language Y without having solid knowledge of both is just lame.

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