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Mark Tanner

Q3 BSP legal issues

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Hi, The new PR BSP features rock, but I''m interested in the following: According to what I''ve read, the Quake3 BSP format is open source (i.e. everyone can use it) but you cannot use any of the Quake3 tools to create it, since then you''d be breaking a license agreement with ID software. Chris (or anyone): Since there are no other good tools that I know of, is it then possible to LEGALLY create a commercial PR game with a BSP? Is there a way around this? I read some post from Chris a while back (I don''t remember which) that there is a way not to break the license agreement. I think this is pretty important for anyone wanting to use PR for commercial games (== professional games). Does anyone know more? Chris, I''d be esp. interested to hear your comments on this, Mark

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Perhaps look at other free map editors:

http://sourceforge.net/projects/quest-ed/
http://www.planetquake.com/Quark/
http://qeradiant.com/gtkradiant.shtml

These are just a few of the ones I found in a few minutes of searching.

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But then wouldn''t the other map editors have some sort of legal issues too? Arn''t those three quake tools too?

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We had this problem with QeRadiant. The EULA explicitly states you can not exploit it in any way for a commercial purpose unless you have purchased a license. We were into heavy development with it when our publisher pulled funding due to this.

I almost think that any of the tools released by ID have these same limitations, just nobody has bothered to walk the line.

Item e states this pretty clear:
2. Prohibitions. You, whether directly or indirectly, shall not do any of the following acts:

a. rent the Software;

b. sell the Software;

c. lease or lend the Software;

d. distribute the Software (except as permitted by section 3. hereinbelow);

e. in any other manner and through any medium whatsoever commercially exploit the Software or use the Software for any commercial purpose;




Edited by - Shawn on April 24, 2001 1:40:47 AM

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So what you''re saying is that the BSP stuff is pretty much useless except for freeware projects, or you buy a license from ethier id or another person who makes BSP software..??

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Guest Anonymous Poster
This is apparently a very important issue. The BSP is really great but how would we make a commercial game without breaking license agreements?
By the way does anyone happen to know how much Q3Radient''s license costs anyways?

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I think you could probably risk it, but ID might decide you made something kick ass and tie your weenie in a knot.

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Here is the licensing page for Q tech:
http://www.idsoftware.com/corporate/idtech/index.html

The only sources released under the GPL are Q1. Q2 requires 125K to license. Valve purchased a license. I would contact The Todd guy and ask him if there are any issues to be worked out before using any tools based on the ones released by ID. The editors that I looked at all used the vis/bsp/etc. tools created by ID. Worldcraft was bought by Valve and only supports Q2 and HL. Quark appears to be the only ED that exports Q3 arena files, and it uses the ID tools. If Todd says it no prob, have fun and build away .

Better safe than sorry.

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