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Am I too old?

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Hey guys! Am I too old to start learning CPP and Opengl? I started learning CPP a few months ago and I bought some books and videos in math. I'm really not that good in math and I was wondering if it's too late 'cause I'm 24 years old. And some dudes were laughin' at me and tellin' me that I can't do it 'cause it's really difficult to learn programming 'cause they also tried it and they all failed. So they ended up taking networking stuff. I put 3 hours in math and a few hours in c++ a day, is that enough? By the time I'm done learning all this maybe I'd be 40 years old, maybe it is too late. How long does it take?!!!. I'm sorry for askin' such stupid questions. THANKS!

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Are you attending college?

If you are motivated enough you can do it. It's a tough road but you can do it. You have to feel it in your heart that this is the thing you want to do. Personally I don't even worry about whether I will succeed in the industry (but tell the truth I get depressed thinking about finding a job in the industry, so many good people out there). I'm doing it as a hobby.

Wait, that was a total contradiction... Let me rephrase that. If you really love it and this is what you really want to do, go for it.

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No, you're not too old.
A little practice here and there is good. A lot of practice all the time is better. Generally, if you stick with something long enough and you have the motivation and enthusiasm you'll become good enough to do work in the industry soon enough.

Good luck, and have fun!

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It's never too late to learn to program. I actually read an article a while ago about an elderly lady (> 80) going to medical school, not the same field, but a good example none the less.

If you worked on it as much as you say you do, and stuck with it, you could probably learn enough to make some games within 2-3 years.

Use others negative attitudes to motivate you, because once you finish a game and are doing something fun and creative, you'll be the one laughing. :)

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I'm also doing this as a hobby. I want to be as good as this one guy here in gamedev.net, his name is "fallingcat". I'm even thinking about quitting guitar(been playing guitar for about 5 years and I'm really good now). I'm also taking one day off of my 4 days a week workout. I need to win the lottery so I can focus on CPP and Opengl. programming is all I'm thinkin' about, even when I'm at work (slacking off learning C++)or when I'm asleep. What do you think about that guys!? This what I've always wanted to do. Every time I see CPP codes, It brings a smile to my face and everyone thinks I'm crazy! anyway, THANK YOU EVERYONE!!! I HOPE FOR THE BEST TO ALL OF YOU!!!

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If you've already shown remarkable technical prowess in electronics or some other engineering type activity, you probably have the 50% of the programmer that is "born" and can learn the other 50% in about 3 years. Build a complete small project first, and then try something just a little more ambitious. Post back to this thread with your game idea, and people will be more than glad to help you gauge how much work you might be looking at. You don't want to make an MMORPG, for example, but a nice tetris or platform game using 3d graphics is pretty doable by a single amateur programmer in a year. It is motivating to finish something 100%, and less motivating if you start the habit of not finishing the projects that you start. That's the main difference between you and me, sir. You'll be 24 and have no unfinished programming projects haunting you. I have about 130 years worth of stuff to finish up... :-)

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Short answer : of course not!!! The math may be a little harder to grasp, but it's nothing that time and perseverence can't ( and won't ) overcome. BTW, since when was 24 old??!?!?!?!?

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Although there was a mention of math in the original post, this thread really has nothing to do with math or physics. It doesn't have much to do with actual programming or OpenGL either, but I don't feel it belongs in the Lounge. So, I'm moving it to For Beginners.

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Quote:
Original post by SyntaxError Line21
Am I too old to start learning CPP and Opengl? ...I'm 24 years old. And some dudes were laughin' at me and tellin' me that I can't do it 'cause it's really difficult to learn programming 'cause they also tried it and they all failed.

So because some losers failed, you're now doubting yourself?

You're a baby. I'm only three years older than you, but, believe me, I know people older than me who started around 30 and are highly productive experts now. Plus, most people don't really learn how to program until they get to college, so you're pretty much par for the course.

Quote:
I put 3 hours in math and a few hours in c++ a day, is that enough?

Who knows? It depends on what you learn during your "few hours," and on how you learn - how you relate it to what you already know, how easily you retain information... There are an infinite number of variables, which is why learning is an individualized affair. The only absolute is that you can learn if you want to an put in the necessary effort (which varies by individual).

Plus, it doesn't take that long to learn enough C++ and OpenGL to make a simple 3D game. And if you're willing to set your sights a little lower 9and maybe use a simpler set of tools), it takes even less time.

Good luck, and happy hacking!

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Well, I'm 27 and learning. I have always loved looking at games and even non game related applications and just wondering... How does it all work? What pieces had to fall together to make the puzzle complete? So I decided to find out and started seriously studying and learning.
I messed with C++ back when I was 16 or so but I had less important things on my mind(that seemed important to a teen).
I find it actually much easier now than I did back then. Maybe it's just me growing up and more of a work ethic I dunno. But I think if you have a true passion about something... there is no cut off age to learning it and being good at it.

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I understand why you think you are to old - alot of programmers start at a very young age, often teens (not in my case) and sometimes that can put a starter off... or make you feel that "others have had a major head start". But its not entirely true. I've meet people that have been trying to learn C++ for about a year, and they aren't really sure how to even use the console yet for simple C libs. Programming isn't for everyone, just because the fellas that took that networking classes didn' stick with it, or got put off by it doesn't mean YOU can't do it. Try - and I am also worried about the math, but take it one step at a time. People say study long, hard hours - if you've got the motivation great, but remember not to cram TO MUCH or you'll be rereading things over and over again. ALWAYS put what you've learned to use! ALWAYS, don't just read the chapter, and type the source code in the chapter... rewrite it, make it your own, or write it from scratch to get the program goals in that chapter done without reading their source code (you'll be looking back and forth in the pages alot as your first start, but then you'll find yourself flipping less and less so don't sweat it.).

The thing I can't stress the most from my learning is that you won't understand everything the first time you read it. As odd as that sounds, try not to stress on what you don't understand all the way.

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Nice thread.

No, you are not too old.
Just because some dude told you "you can't do it" that does not mean you actually can't. You can, and you will succeed if you practice (and this is for every field of activity not only programming). I'm quite new to C# too but am catching things while I experiment. If you don't understand some concept, give it a little time, and some practice for that specific thing. You will learn as time goes by, there is nothing difficult, only scary at first because there's so many unknown things. At first it may be frustrating (it was for me at least and some stuff still is) but this determines you to retry and retry and retry. This is how we learned to walk when we were babies, we fell a lot, but we got on our own feet again and again and again until walking became natural :)

Practice ... is all that matters.

Also if at first you do not understand something even after retrying, dont get stuck on it - get over that one and learn other concepts, and you will naturally get back to that one when you will need it but you will have other approaches in mind by then.

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Why do people ask this silly question? Nobody is ever too old to learn anything. There are people in their 70's and 80's that go to college. Nola Ochs graduated with a degree in history this year from Fort Hays State University in Kansas. She is 95.

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Quote:
Original post by JohnBolton
Why do people ask this silly question? Nobody is ever too old to learn anything. There are people in their 70's and 80's that go to college. Nola Ochs graduated with a degree in history this year from Fort Hays State University in Kansas. She is 95.

Tell dem.

I had a classmate at UNC Greensboro, in chemistry, who was a silver-haired grandmother. And she got As. You could see the excitement to learn in her eyes; it was incredible.

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Too old to learn? Never.

Pay losers no mind, and make friends with winners. Life-long rule.

You may observe that the mainstays in the corporate software world tend to be in their 30s and 40s...and they learn new stuff on a regular basis. :) It's all about attitude.

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Quote:
Original post by SyntaxError Line21
I'm also doing this as a hobby. I want to be as good as this one guy here in gamedev.net, his name is "fallingcat". I'm even thinking about quitting guitar(been playing guitar for about 5 years and I'm really good now).


Wait, wait. Are you the kind of person who obsesses over something for a few years, then gets bored and moves on to the next thing? Are you gonna hit 40 and then think, "well, I played guitar in my early 20, programmed games in my late 20s, painted landscapes in my early 30s, and studied Latin until recently, but I'm no good at any of those now"?

Slow down, get your priorities right. You sound far too exuberant about programming and far too willing to give up the things that you used to find important. You need to find a balance. Why did you take up guitar, and why would you quit? What sort of career do you want, and what sort of hobbies do you want? What is going to matter to you in 5 years' time?

You're nowhere near too old to pick up a new skill like programming, and it's a very rewarding skill to have, but there will come a point where you may regret not picking something to stick with to the point of mastery.

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Quote:
Original post by JohnBolton
Why do people ask this silly question? Nobody is ever too old to learn anything. There are people in their 70's and 80's that go to college. Nola Ochs graduated with a degree in history this year from Fort Hays State University in Kansas. She is 95.


I'm 43 going back. Not really looking at a degree, just wanting to increase my math and physics knowledge. All for the sole purpose of game development.

I may take what classes I can in advanced data structures, but I think I've done well on my own for programming, I just need to know how to use integration to prevent planets from spinning out of simulated orbits and out in to simulated deep space.

Runge-Kutta matata.

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too late man, too late...!
you probally will be meeried after some yoars and your wife will call you:
"aaaaaggghhh. craaaap. SyntaxErrooooooooooor ...!"
"go and clear this crap . your child making anywhere crappy including him shorts."
and your pc will be busy.
because there is your child looking to a page titled:"professional craps"
and thats just small part of it.

so shortly too late man too late for anything.

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I hope your not, I'm 30 and quit my job last year to attend university and do BSc Computer Games Science which will hopefully get me a few steps in the right direction.

To be honest my maths isn't great at the moment this is mainly due to the fact that since 16 I haven't really done any real mathematics so jumping in with the 3d math required for my course was a struggle. Currently I'm re-learning all my basic math in my spare time which is going really well.

So imo it's never too late.

Malal

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No you're not to old as others have said.

I would recommend not starting with C++ as your first language, because you have to worry about a lot of things right from the start. I recommend starting with a language like Java or Python. Then after a year, after you gain a good grasp of programming in that language, and have completed some sort of big project in one of those languages switch to C++.

It's not impossible to start with C++, but given that there are easier alternatives, I suggest taking advantage of them. On the other hand, learning C++ first means you will be programming in C++ sooner, so If you can pull it off, then you may be better off.

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I'm 27, married and have a newborn daughter and I'm in the process of getting into game programming. I'm in the telecomm industry right now, but I would like to move into game programming as a career. Just takes hardwork and being able to stick with it through to the end.

The time it will take will be dependent on the time and attention you want to put into it. I think a few hours a day is probably good, just make sure what you have learned has stuck and write small programs as you go along.

Here's some advice I was given: Clicky.

Derek

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For all those people worried about their Maths, I can say that I was in a similar boat to a lot of you. Im now 22 and was lucky enough to get a position in the games industry last september as a Gameplay Engineer, after graduating Uni.

At the time I started I had very very limited knowledge of vector and matrix math. At uni I got told the equations for dot products and cross products but what I would use them for...I had no idea. ( This is after having studied no maths since secondary school )

I tried looking on various websites and forums, greeted with mysterious words such as upvectors and normals, all of it meant nothing to me, until the first day of my job when I had to use them. As soon as I started using them it all fell into place and really, it is quite easy, as with most things once you understand the concept you can use them all the time.

Vectors are pretty essential, I remember somewhere reading that the Dot Product was the Swiss Army Knife of programming, which Is very true. Once you learn it it will make your life alot easier.

Matrix and Quaternion maths were the next areas which I learnt again these seem pretty complex but, once you understand there workings and how you use them they really help to make life as a gameplay programmer alot easier.

Basically, there is hope if you stick with it you will get it! But try coding the maths as you learn it, using it will help cement it in your head far easier!

Hope that helps

Chris





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Age 24 is still young. Sure, kids who start honing in on their analytical skills while in K-12 will probably have a good advantage later in life but does not imply that it puts someone in their 20s in a position that makes it hard or impossible to succeed in the field either.

In my case I went back to college at age 23 majoring in Computer Science and started almost from scratch having also forgotten most of the mathematics I learned in high school, and even then I never went past trigonometry. But I persevered and absorbed as much as I could in classes (especially since now I was paying for my college education and was motivated to get my moneys worth). In the end I graduated at age 28 last month with a B.S. in an ABET accredited C.S. program at a state school and managed to get into my career as an Embedded Software Engineer for a large corporation. I also would have to add that a lot of what I learned in my major I supplemented with studying and experimenting outside of the classroom because even in college there is only so much that can be crammed into one semester courses.

Now whether you choose to go to college or not is a personal preference but either way if you put the ax to the grindstone by studying hard and not getting discouraged at challenging material you will see benefits. It may feel very difficult when first starting out, but once you overcome some hurdles initially it'll give you confidence which also gives you some momentum in moving ahead.

Good luck to you.

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