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Andakinas

Is it worth it to create a Game Engine?

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Hello everyone. I've been wondering this question for a few days now, so I'll finally ask it. There are many game engines out there, but do they offer you a lot? If there isn't much of a difference between making a game engine and just using one premade, please tell me. I'm the type of person who would rather code in c++ than visual basic although it be easier, because c++ is much more powerful. Tell me what you think, and the same question applies for map makers. Thanks!

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Well, I'd say if you want to learn how systems work and how to properly design software, study engine design and write an engine.

However if you want to make a game, just write a game. You don't have to have an engine to start making a game. One thing a lot of people starting out don't realize is that engine != game. I'm sure someone will post up that article about making games vs engines soon enough, it's a good read.

Nothing wrong with using an existing engine either. Ogre is good if you like coding, it only provides an easy to use rendering framework, the rest of the code you have to write yourself.

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It depends.

Nearly every game engine is specialized for certain types of games. There is no such thing as a universal or genre-agnostic game engine; that's just a library of routines and objects. An engine is the integration of those routines and objects to expedite the development of a specific game.

There are genres for which available free or cheap game engines are excellent choices. FPSes, medium-sized RPGs and... well, that's really about it. If you're working outside of this, either the game is not content-heavy enough (including scripts as content) that an engine isn't strictly necessary, or there's nothing out there for you and you have to roll your own.

With tools like map makers, the concern is that each one imposes its own constraints and conventions on generated content. If you want to add special objects to your map after the fact, but the map maker stores the map data such that it can not reasonably be altered, then you need to look for another. And if there is none that quite matches your requirements, then you are fully justified in rolling your own.

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The game engine would be because it's aimed to be an online game, which is why I'm asking. Also I sorta mean do game engines like Ogre make a game seem less professional and make it harder to do what you want?

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I thank you and Dancin for your replies, I'm going for a mmorpg. Of course, it would be a morpg at first, and not for a long time. I just don't know if once (and if) the game gets big that there won't be much room for it to grow considering using an engine. And could the engine maker/map making company take away your right to use their product free because of success?
Quote:
Original post by Oluseyi
It depends.

Nearly every game engine is specialized for certain types of games. There is no such thing as a universal or genre-agnostic game engine; that's just a library of routines and objects. An engine is the integration of those routines and objects to expedite the development of a specific game.

There are genres for which available free or cheap game engines are excellent choices. FPSes, medium-sized RPGs and... well, that's really about it. If you're working outside of this, either the game is not content-heavy enough (including scripts as content) that an engine isn't strictly necessary, or there's nothing out there for you and you have to roll your own.

With tools like map makers, the concern is that each one imposes its own constraints and conventions on generated content. If you want to add special objects to your map after the fact, but the map maker stores the map data such that it can not reasonably be altered, then you need to look for another. And if there is none that quite matches your requirements, then you are fully justified in rolling your own.


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Quote:
Original post by Andakinas
The game engine would be because it's aimed to be an online game, which is why I'm asking. Also I sorta mean do game engines like Ogre make a game seem less professional and make it harder to do what you want?


Are you a professional? No. So Ogre isn't going to be less professional than anything you might get working.

Game engines and libraries in general offer you exceptionally more than you can possibly imagine if you're even asking the question.

The sooner you learn that (and to ditch C++, and to ditch even a non-M, non-M, non-O, RPG at this point if I judge you correctly) the sooner you can get to actually making that MMORPG.

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I hate it when people have a completely wrong mindset of how to help a person out. I clearly said and it's not going to be made for a long time. What gives you the idea that I'm going to begin it right now? I'm reading loads of material and practicing coding projects. Nowhere did I say that I'm currently working on it. Go be a condescending jerk somewhere else, please.

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Quote:
Original post by Andakinas
I hate it when people have a completely wrong mindset of how to help a person out. I clearly said and it's not going to be made for a long time. What gives you the idea that I'm going to begin it right now?


The hundreds of For Beginner posts from people who like C++ for its power and have great dreams of their 'simple' (but horribly more complex than they can imagine) game that they're going to make over a 'long time' (read: 4-12x the time a fully staffed professional studio would take to make the game, which is still woefully insufficient for such an endeavor).

Including my own.

I am offering the best possible advice I can to help you out in your goals an not repeating my follies. How else would you like me to help you?

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I'm going into something I don't have a good understanding for. That's true, and I know that. But if you think I'm unaware of just what goes into it, you're wrong. I know it's going to be over a million lines of code, I know about the graphics libraries, the network libraries, the server side set-up, the client interface, the character attributes, etc. I know the range of how hard it's going to be, and I don't by any means believe it's going to be simple. But once I get it to the point where theres even some promise for the game, I hope for other coders to join the project. I know that it takes a very long time to make a game with a small team, especially one that doesn't already understand the code. But people have done it before, people have created good games in short periods of time, learning the code at an incredible rate. You can view this as they either understand some of the things that go into it, (for instance the math) that they learn fast, that they have a very strong drive for what their goal is, or that they have a lot of time on their hands. I believe that I can learn faster than most people have, given the advantages of time, my drive, my learning speed, and that I'm already familiar with a lot of things about computers and math. You just feel that I'm like the majority of these people, who are oblivious to what goes into it, and lazy. You got the lazy part right, but in the past 3 days I've read over 300 pages about c++, and learned many things. I've went to a lot of websites and asked questions and I am indeed willing to learn. I appreciate that you were honest like that though.

Quote:
Original post by Telastyn

The hundreds of For Beginner posts from people who like C++ for its power and have great dreams of their 'simple' (but horribly more complex than they can imagine) game that they're going to make over a 'long time' (read: 4-12x the time a fully staffed professional studio would take to make the game, which is still woefully insufficient for such an endeavor).

Including my own.

I am offering the best possible advice I can to help you out in your goals an not repeating my follies. How else would you like me to help you?


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Making an engine is a very rewarding, but slow and challenging, and very slow process. I'd recommend getting a few years of experience using existing engines (such as by working on some mods for popular games, etc...) first, so that you know what you like and don't like about existing engine designs.
Oh, and did I mention that it's a slow process? ;)

Quote:
Original post by Andakinas
Go be a condescending jerk somewhere else, please.

There's no point trying to fight condescension on this board - it and arrogance are part of the culture here and going against the grain tends to get you rated down. If you think someone's being a jerk, just ignore them.

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