Jump to content
  • Advertisement
Sign in to follow this  
Sereth

A question for those in the industry

This topic is 4009 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

If you intended to correct an error in the post then please contact us.

Recommended Posts

Hi all, I'm pretty new to programming both game and otherwise. Long story but I'm a college student and recently switched my major to computer science, and I'm sort of realizing that my school doesn't have a particularly good program. It isn't necessarily bad, but it's not great either. I was thinking about maybe trying to transfer to another school in a year or so. I was wondering, for those of you who have jobs in game development and maybe see new people coming in, how much of a difference does the school make in the long run? I was also wondering about how beneficial game development schools or programs in schools really are? I was looking at the program at Devry but it seems like I could end up pigeon-holing myself if I do that. Any suggestions or opinions would be greatly appreciated, I'm really not sure what would be best. Much thanks to anyone willing to offer some wisdom

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Advertisement
In the end it doesn't really matter what school you go to. What is important is that you make sure that your own skills are up to par. Different companies will run you through different tests, but some of the things you'll expect to see are being able to do relatively complex calculation in your head over the phone, work up algorithms in C++ on a white board in front of your future coworkers, etc. If you know your stuff, you know your stuff. Where you got your degree from doesn't really matter.

Work on making sure you know how to program and you know how to program well. Make games and focus on writing code that just doesn't get the job done, but gets it done eloquently.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The name of your school is only going to be useful in very specific cases to get very specific jobs [super-big-name schools and super-snobby jobs], or to transfer to other schools. If you are particularly concerned about the quality of your school's program, keep in mind that there is a requirement that your school has to meet to hand out valid degrees in any given field [the program requires accreditation]. If your program is accredited, then your degree will largely have the same weight as the same degree from any other school, barring the super-big-name schools [Berkeley, MIT, CalTech].

Your degree will only get your foot in the door a little, your value will be decided initially by a portfolio and demonstration that you've got what others want. Be able to show people samples of your work, show that you can do what people need done [if you're going to graduate school, that means possibly publishing papers, articles, whatever involves you showing command over a field of study. Host workshops, hold officer positions in computer clubs, be a teacher in whatever capacity. If you're going for a job, be ready to submit samples of code, projects you've worked on even if unfinished, and at least some things that you have finished. Make sure that which you submit is of consistent and high quality, and shows a technical understanding of your field.]

Few bits about this particular subject though :
1:The school you attend matters very little compared to demonstration of your ability.
2:Your GPA at any school will likely never be asked of you once you leave the academic world.
3:Take it upon yourself to teach yourself at all times, and consider that which is covered in your classes as the bare can't-do-any-worse minimum. [you will find many of your peers will lack this self-study, even if their grades are higher. They will be considered less valuable than you in the long run if you take it upon yourself to push your own education.]

[Edited by - Drigovas on September 29, 2007 6:19:57 PM]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

  • Advertisement
×

Important Information

By using GameDev.net, you agree to our community Guidelines, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy.

We are the game development community.

Whether you are an indie, hobbyist, AAA developer, or just trying to learn, GameDev.net is the place for you to learn, share, and connect with the games industry. Learn more About Us or sign up!

Sign me up!