Sign in to follow this  

Using Artificial Intelligence within an Operating System Enviroment

This topic is 3728 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

If you intended to correct an error in the post then please contact us.

Recommended Posts

maybe for the heck of it..
AI can be used for example to manage threads, to confirm halting properties if possible...
Maybe you're aiming at a very high level operating system, a platform perhaps like .NET... Probably there is some kind of 'simple' AI for garbage collection and things like that.
The more you think about AI in a specific subject, the less it's clear what AI is..

My 0.5 cents

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Thanks for the replys, perhaps AI can be used for file lookups within a file system to find the most economical way possible of locating file sectors within the shortest amount of time instead of using say a tree like system. I also like your idea Arithma of using AI for the management of multi-tasking systems, and memory management.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
This reminds me of a macro program someone put together for the Mac OS. It would sit around and wait for you to do things.
If it ever determined that you were just repeating the same set of steps over and over, it would sugest an automation,
let you confirm that the automation did in fact do what you were doing, and would then finish the task in the background
and tell you when it was done.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I think if you're using AI to do things like maximise performance then you're going to run into the problem where you're actually wasting time trying to find a better solution when really I would have been quicker to just do it. An example is when windows spends more time calculating how long it'll take to copy a file, than it does actually copying the file.

AI generally takes quite a bit of processing which makes it a waste to use it to find better performance in a realtime system. I'm not saying AI in an OS wouldn't have it's uses, I just think it's the wrong tool for the job.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by instinKt
<snip> An example is when windows spends more time calculating how long it'll take to copy a file, than it does actually copying the file.</snip>


Especially when it says "4,238,923 minutes remaining".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Yes i do see what you mean about the AI performance risk but isn't that risk very similar to the current type of implimentatios we have these days within the operating systems we use? for instance the file indexing service of a file system has to do quite a bit of processing to write or retrieve a file.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I think you're going to have to be more specific when you say "AI". Most (probably all) operating systems use heuristics, estimations, predictions, and other kinds of "smart" programming that would probably fall under the very broad umbrella of AI. Even search algorithms can be called AI.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by GameMasterXL
Yes i do see what you mean about the AI performance risk but isn't that risk very similar to the current type of implimentatios we have these days within the operating systems we use? for instance the file indexing service of a file system has to do quite a bit of processing to write or retrieve a file.


Yes but simply because it's used today does not mean it's a good thing. I very much dislike the direction Microsoft are taking their OS.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The guessing stuff is very much A.I.

Probably some sort of bayes inferencing, which is often also used in things like spam detection.

Infact, I think there are a lot of places where bayes inferencing could be applied to OS's, both at the back end and at the front end

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by d000hg
Do we count mouse gestures as AI? Or speech recognition for that matter...?

Doesn't all the stuff in Office that tries to guess what you want to do count as AI?


Do we count these things as part of an OS? Is the windows shell part of the OS? Are the drivers for a microkernel architecture part of the OS?

The original question was about operating system kernels. Now in an ideal design, I don't think any of those things would be part of the kernel.

A* could potentially be used for optimizing database query plans, just like any other search algorithm.

Anything could be used in an operating system kernel, and anything could be put in the kernel. If a database is part of a kernel, and the file system uses complex database techniques, then A* can be used to optimize its query plans. You could make a kernel where processes fight each other inside of a real time strategy game which is controlled by the kernel. It doesn't make any sense, but it is possible.

Heuristics are used for scheduling processes. Is this AI?

To really answer the original question, we'd need to answer two difficult questions: what is an OS kernel, and what is AI?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This topic is 3728 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

If you intended to correct an error in the post then please contact us.

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this