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Is Dev-Cpp still Supported ??

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Thanks me,

I thought not since it's been so long in updating. Too bad, Dev-Cpp was nice.

I'll give Code-Blocks another try I guess. I want to stay away from MS stuff since it always takes over the machine. I want it lean & mean, get me ?

Cheers!
grofaz

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You know there's nothing wrong with not liking Microsoft... That's your prerogative. But, not using their tool (visual studio express) which is free and by far the most effective for pretty much any job, is just plain ignorance.

Now under linux obviously you can't use VS express but if you on a windows machine I see no reason why it's a bad idea to use. And what was so good about dev-cpp? For the short time I used it three years ago I hated it.

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Original post by jpetrie
Visual Studio is an excellent IDE and does not "take over the machine."


Agreed. There's no better IDE on Windows (and nothing that even comes close).

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I have MS crap and would like very much not to use it, so I'm looking for something good but less bloated.


If you really refuse to use MS products I dont think you're going to find anything as good as VS. Really, I don't think theres anything even in the same league. If you find something, please link me. :)

Out of curiosity though - what about VS is bloated?

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Minimum installation requirements are 1.3 GB for Visual Studio C++, then there's the paltform SDK, DirectX SDK, etc, etc, etc....

I don't recall the size of Dev-C++ but the package was around and about 300 MB more or less.

I can live with masm32 and hla on Windows thank you very much.

Else I got Linux covered.

Enjoy,
grofaz

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Original post by grofaz
Minimum installation requirements are 1.3 GB for Visual Studio C++, then there's the paltform SDK, DirectX SDK, etc, etc, etc....

I don't recall the size of Dev-C++ but the package was around and about 300 MB more or less.

I can live with masm32 and hla on Windows thank you very much.

Else I got Linux covered.

Enjoy,
grofaz


You'd have to setup the DX SDK or any SDK regardless of what compiler or IDE you use. Though Dev-C++ did work with Win32 out the box, it's doesn't handle managed code either. Plus most modern or computers from 2002 can handle a 1.3 GB install. What kinda computer do you have?

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My pc can handle the install, I just don't want to install it.

I've used MS stuff in the past and I know all about it, well enough about it anyway. :)

I know I don't want it on my machine. It's not a MS political thing, it's a product thing.

I use masm32 which is MS stuff too. But it's nice and lean.

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Original post by grofaz
My pc can handle the install, I just don't want to install it.

I've used MS stuff in the past and I know all about it, well enough about it anyway. :)

I know I don't want it on my machine. It's not a MS political thing, it's a product thing.

I use masm32 which is MS stuff too. But it's nice and lean.


Apples and oranges.

VS has felt large and chunky in the past and I refused to use it for some time, but I have come back to the express versions of their IDE and I am very impressed.

Say what you want about Microsoft but I don't think you'll get anyone who knows what he's talking about telling you that the current versions of VS are not good.

Like others have said, what ever IDE you use, you'll have to install SDKs which are usually quite large, but there's no getting past that if you want to develop using these SDKs. As far as Dev-C++ coming with the platform SDK, I've heard that it's some "chopped down", bastardised version of the SDK.

My advice is get over the unsubstantiated stigma about VS and use it.

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Original post by grofaz
My pc can handle the install, I just don't want to install it.

I've used MS stuff in the past and I know all about it, well enough about it anyway. :)

I know I don't want it on my machine. It's not a MS political thing, it's a product thing.

What product thing? Microsoft Visual C++ Express is free, stable and robust enough for most projects. How does that not meet your criteria? The only alternative offered up is CodeBlocks which is also free, but definitely not as stable as Visual C++ Express.

Personally I use CodeBlocks with Ubuntu, but wouldn't choose it for Windows since there is a better tool for the job. So I'm really interested in what you 'know all about' Microsoft's present offerings. What is it that makes them inferior?

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I'm new here, so I don't know what you mean by "supported", but I've been using Eclipse with the C/C++ development toolkit (CDT), and using MinGW as my toolchain. It's not quite as nice for windows-specific stuff, but is decent and free (in both senses).

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grofaz, you do realize that MASM is actually a part of Visual Studio, right? I realize you can get it as a separate install as MASM32 (much the way VSTookKit was to the whole of Visual Studio), but it is indeed a part of Visual Studio.

You can also have all of the variants of win32 projects with ONLY assembly files if you wish. Infact, VS 2005 and beyond directly supports syntax hilighting and line-based debugging for assembly products (induction of usertype.dat is necessary for hilighting). I use it for assembly projects myself (not exclusively).

You should try it sometime, you might like it.

P.S. I do understand the whole "lean and mean" mentality, which is why I use assembler for selective optimization in my projects. And please, for the love of all that is good in the programming world, do not use dev-cpp.

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what's with everybody trying to cram visual studio down his throat? if he doesn't want to use it then he doesn't want to use it.

as far as non-MS IDEs go my vote goes to code::blocks, i was also looking at MinGW Developer Studio, haven't tried it but it might be worth checking out.

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As another alternative you can try RadASM. Not only is it the premiere assembly IDE for win32, but it also supports many other languages including c++. It is written entirely in assembly so it is lightweight and rather fast. ;)

It officially supports msvc 6 but you can coerce it into using msvc7+. Includes resource editor, dialog editor, code completion, etc. Works with HLA, too. Having used assembler you might already be aware of this, but I thought I might throw it out there for you. This is what I was referring to when I said "not exclusively" when speaking of Visual Studio with assembly source.

http://www.radasm.com/download/radasm.html

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what's with everybody trying to cram visual studio down his throat? if he doesn't want to use it then he doesn't want to use it.

And there's nothing wrong with that. However, it behooves him to realize that not wanting to use because it's made by Microsoft and thus must be bloatware and take over the system like other Microsoft software makes him look rather foolish.

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Original post by jpetrie
Quote:

what's with everybody trying to cram visual studio down his throat? if he doesn't want to use it then he doesn't want to use it.

And there's nothing wrong with that. However, it behooves him to realize that not wanting to use because it's made by Microsoft and thus must be bloatware and take over the system like other Microsoft software makes him look rather foolish.


Man, all I asked was a simple question re Dev-C++, but you can read all you want into it and I guess you did. If you read my posts you'll see repeatedly that I am familiar with MSVC, indeed versions 6,7,& 8, and I don't like it cause imho it's fat bloated and ugly. Even though it works great for coding windows stuff.

Thanks for the remind about MinGW Dev Studio, I used that once upon a time also and forgot all about it. I'll have to look it up again. Also RadASM, I used that too, but like HIDE better for HLA. I also use, albeit not much as of yet, WinASM. Have to look more into that one also re coding in C/C++. Perhaps it's also doable.

Now enough is enough about MS Studio already. If you like it, use it, and let me explore other possibilities.

grofaz
mean & lean

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Well if you have an obsession with software that isn't bloated then you don't want to use any of these IDEs - they're just taking up space. Find a copy of vi for windows and download MinGW to use as a compiler.

If you don't then really the only reasonable alternative to MSVS is Code::Blocks

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