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Starting at a young age

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I am currently 15 years old of age and already been studying c# and computer security. I have came across the gaming industry because i love games and have many ideas. I enjoy little of programming, but i would like to organize and build up the game instead of programming alot and coding. I was searching through this website about beginning to be a developer, but it seems like its just programming. Please correct me if i am wrong and point me out where should i start for a DEVELOPER.

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Computer Science, Mathematics, Physics or Electrical Engineering university. These aren't required or implied, but they'll give you theoretical foundation applicable to development. Other engineering branches can be useful as well.

Aside from that, corporate development practices and formal development process that you learn through experience in internships and/or paid jobs.

Only after you've been "broken in", can you consider becoming true developer, and not just coder.

One expectation employers these days have from developers is not just incredibly in-depth technical knowledge, but ability to reason, compromise, be able to work on your own, make educated decisions, and, last but not least, deal with corporate BS.

Writing code is just the most basic step. But for anything semi-big, you'll need to know how to work with other tools, such as UML, be able to follow the development plans and deadlines, and associated compromises, be able to adapt to varying team performance, communicate with people of different backgrounds and domains, and be familiar with constraints of the business - there is only X amount of money available, we need to do with what we have.

Developers are usually people who have been exposed to various aspects associated with software development in general. Some don't know how to code. Some don't work with computers, but customers. Some don't code, but plan.

"A developer" is someone who's contributing to project as a whole - as such they will need a set of mixed skills.

As for you - keep coding on real, paid projects.

The alternative is to become a manager. But pure managers don't directly deal with development, they're more concerned with money, deadlines and other departments.

If you want to stick on the development side, then getting your hands dirty is almost non-escapable. Generally, developers that don't develop are rare - pure (middle-)management however tends to exist only in large corporations, smaller companies prefer people who contribute directly and hands on.

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No one will hire you to make a game if you have never made a game before. You have ideas, and that is great, but ideas are a dime a dozen.

Fact is unless you own the company or you are an expert, you stand little chance of becoming the person who picks which game idea to make.

So learn to program well, make a few games, and improve your skills. Show the world how well you can make games and if you are good enough then you stand a shot.

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