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Linux C++ IDE??

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Mods: If this is in the wrong place please move it! I cant seem to find a nice IDE to run on linux...Any suggestions would be appreciated! Thanks

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Original post by hahaha
Mods: If this is in the wrong place please move it!
I cant seem to find a nice IDE to run on linux...Any suggestions would be appreciated!


Hmm, here's a nice little list, right at your fingertips.

--smw

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IMHO:

Every feature rich IDE available for Linux sucks with the exception of Eclipse. However the last time I tried to get the C++ plug in for Eclipse working it required a rain dance and resulted in sorts of frustration. Hopefully since then the plugin has improved.

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Here is a new hot tip: MonoDevelop now does C++. I haven't tried it for C++, but I liked it for C# coding, so it might be worth checking out.

Normally I just "build" my own IDE with a few console windows + gvim.

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Quote:
Original post by fpsgamer
IMHO:

Every feature rich IDE available for Linux sucks with the exception of Eclipse. However the last time I tried to get the C++ plug in for Eclipse working it required a rain dance and resulted in sorts of frustration. Hopefully since then the plugin has improved.


It has indeed, they've packaged it nicely all ready to go Eclipse IDE for C/C++ Developers. Works great for me! :)

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I’ve just been using KDevelop and so far I’m happy. It’s got its quirks, indeed, but since the last time I tried it I can say it’s improved a lot.

And being a hadcore Linux fan, I’ve got to mention GVim. [grin]

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I would recommend Sun Studio 12. On top of having a good IDE with intellisense and all those goodies, it features a professional profiler, debugger, and additionally has tools for multithreaded debugging (such as being able to detect deadlock, etc. ).

Keep in mind Sun Studio 12 is not netbeans, it compiles C, C++, and Fortran code.

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Well, Netbeans can be used with a c++ compiler as well. Never used with c++, though, so I don't know if it supports auto completion, visual debugging, and so on...

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I've tried a number of open source IDE's. I cannot comment on closed source products. However, I have settled with the Eclipse CDT. I used to use Gentoo Linux but found that Ubuntu gives an almost 'trouble-free' Linux experience. On Ubuntu the Eclipse CDT runs like a charm. I highly recommend it, and cannot see any reason to use any other. It also has a native Java development environment, if you are so inclined, and is being adapted to other languages.

--random

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Quote:
Original post by aCynic2
Emacs + gcc == purity.

jed is also a nice editor that provides a link to gcc, color syntax highlighting, etc...

It's just that emacs can do EVERYTHING you need.


Where's your debugger?

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I like kate/kwrite.
And with the text completion plugin you have minimal and good enough word-completion facility (working exactly like the vi-completion).

Other tools I've been using are gdb(, ddd), valgrind, Krazy2 (automatic, plugable code-checker of KDE4-Project).

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I have to admit that I do supplement Eclipse with Kate because it is so easy to edit with. One of the drawbacks of Eclipse (maybe I don't know how to use it properly) is the editing of a single file. Doing things like find/replace etc. Kate is easier for this. Eclipse has a very powerful feature called 'refactor/rename' which will parse everything in the project, but sometimes that is too much power for me, and sometimes the refactoring cannot be safely done across files.

--random

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Any specific reason you *need* an IDE.

For most things I just use either Gedit or Vim to write source code, and I compile with the gcc from the command line. If I ever need some overly specific compile configuration, or I need to link to more than a few libraries, I just use a makefile.

Personally, I think most IDE's are far too over-bloated and just downright unnecessary for the most part. I mean you have your source code, and then you have the compiler -> compile the source code. Must you really have another piece of software standing in the middle?

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Original post by Vuk Samotnjak
Any specific reason you *need* an IDE.

For most things I just use either Gedit or Vim to write source code, and I compile with the gcc from the command line. If I ever need some overly specific compile configuration, or I need to link to more than a few libraries, I just use a makefile.

Personally, I think most IDE's are far too over-bloated and just downright unnecessary for the most part. I mean you have your source code, and then you have the compiler -> compile the source code. Must you really have another piece of software standing in the middle?


Either you're a masochist or you've never worked on a large long-term project.


Quote:
Original post by aCynic2
Quote:
Original post by Omid Ghavami
Quote:
Original post by aCynic2
Emacs + gcc == purity.

jed is also a nice editor that provides a link to gcc, color syntax highlighting, etc...

It's just that emacs can do EVERYTHING you need.


Where's your debugger?


gdb hooks into emacs quite nicely.


Well I guess that makes Emacs + gcc == purity with lacking functionality. The simple clean solution is nice and all but if you're working on serious projects functionality comes first and you'll eventually end up with more or less the same package.

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Quote:
Original post by Omid Ghavami
Quote:
Original post by Vuk Samotnjak
For most things I just use either Gedit or Vim to write source code, and I compile with the gcc from the command line. If I ever need some overly specific compile configuration, or I need to link to more than a few libraries, I just use a makefile.

Personally, I think most IDE's are far too over-bloated and just downright unnecessary for the most part. I mean you have your source code, and then you have the compiler -> compile the source code. Must you really have another piece of software standing in the middle?


Either you're a masochist or you've never worked on a large long-term project.


Hey, I've been a professional software developer since the early 1980s. I've worked on many large long-term projects and am doing so as we speak. I use gvim, the command line, and the autotools exclusively for all development tasks except GUI design.

I am not a masochist.

I am very familair with my tools and techniques and I fail to see how some fancy GUI that takes up all my valuable screen real estate and make me move my hands over to the mouse can accelerate my development process.

I am not trying to proselytize here. I'm merely pointing out that it requires neither naivte nor ignorance to use tried-and-true traditional tools by preference.

I would, however, like to point out that several of the younger guys here at work have dropped their IDEs in favour of learning vi in an effort to improve their productivity -- and none of them have gone back.

--smw

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Vi is awsome, but when tackling a large unfamiliar codebase, features like visual studios "Find all references" is like magic candy from the gods.

When working on a very consistently structured project, or something you have written mostly yourself heavyweight tools like MSVC just gets in the way IMHO.

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Quote:
Original post by Bregma
Quote:
Original post by Omid Ghavami
Quote:
Original post by Vuk Samotnjak
For most things I just use either Gedit or Vim to write source code, and I compile with the gcc from the command line. If I ever need some overly specific compile configuration, or I need to link to more than a few libraries, I just use a makefile.

Personally, I think most IDE's are far too over-bloated and just downright unnecessary for the most part. I mean you have your source code, and then you have the compiler -> compile the source code. Must you really have another piece of software standing in the middle?


Either you're a masochist or you've never worked on a large long-term project.


Hey, I've been a professional software developer since the early 1980s. I've worked on many large long-term projects and am doing so as we speak. I use gvim, the command line, and the autotools exclusively for all development tasks except GUI design.

I am not a masochist.

I am very familair with my tools and techniques and I fail to see how some fancy GUI that takes up all my valuable screen real estate and make me move my hands over to the mouse can accelerate my development process.

I am not trying to proselytize here. I'm merely pointing out that it requires neither naivte nor ignorance to use tried-and-true traditional tools by preference.

I would, however, like to point out that several of the younger guys here at work have dropped their IDEs in favour of learning vi in an effort to improve their productivity -- and none of them have gone back.

--smw


Are you developing with a command line debugger?

I find vi/emacs much better in editing source code files than VS but VS has a very nice and powerful debugger that I think is a terrific productivity booster.

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Quote:
Original post by rollo
Vi is awsome, but when tackling a large unfamiliar codebase, features like visual studios "Find all references" is like magic candy from the gods.

Wow, Visual Studio can perform a recursive grep at the push of a button, just like gvim? That is hawesome.

--smw

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Quote:
Original post by Libe
Are you developing with a command line debugger?

I find vi/emacs much better in editing source code files than VS but VS has a very nice and powerful debugger that I think is a terrific productivity booster.


Yes, when I have to use a debugger I use gdb from the command line. There are a number of GUI wrappers around gdb available on Linux but since I rarely do anything except stack backtraces and the occasional structure dump I find anything except the command line interface just gets in the way.

One of the biggest reasons I use gvim is that it looks and works exactly the same on Linux, Windows, and Mac OS X (and pretty much every Unix under the, uh, sun). Emacs, too, does that but emacs was such a pig back in the old 386-based Unix days that I had to take the vi route.

--smw

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