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GenuineXP

Geometry Wars Style Grid & Distortions

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So I'm creating a Geometry Wars clone (called Prism) mostly as a showcase for my game engine. One very interesting aspect I'm having trouble figuring out is how to setup the grid used in the Retro Evolved version of Geometry Wars. If you're not familiar with it, the grid is a series of aligned dots all interconnected by lines in a... well, a grid! As some objects move through the grid (which is the playing field), the grid is distorted and sways around. For instance, a fired bullet "cuts" through the grid, forcing dots out of its path. The dots spring back into position until distorted again. How exactly can this effect be accomplished? I'd like to stick to as simple a method as possible. Would this employ some kind of fluid dynamics, or perhaps each dot is attached to its home position by a spring? I'm really at a loss with this one. Could it be simpler? I don't know the first thing about implementing even a very simple fluid system or springs, so any helpful links would be appreciated (if those techniques are applicable). Currently, the grid consists of a container (std::vector<std::vector<boost::shared_ptr<Particle> > >) of Particle objects that are linked to two other Particles. Right now, the links are used exclusively for rendering and adding the other two possible links wouldn't be too hard at all. From this, I'd have a container of interconnected Particles. I don't know if this information is helpful or not, but I thought I'd share. Any help is greatly appreciated. Thanks!

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Well, if you watch it, it's pretty obvious that it's either a cloth simulation or a fluid simulation. (Or somewhere in between.) So the question is, which one to use? The spring method you mention is essentially a cloth simulation. The trouble with those is that they're very difficult to make stable.

Personally, I suspect that your best bet is a fluid simulation with a very non-viscous fluid and very heavy affectors. (Disclaimer: this is total guesswork, because I don't know anything about fluid simulation.) That way, you get very powerful damping effects but a nice smooth motion.

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