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rHornbek

"Dude you just scored!"

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rHornbek    175
No this is not a game where you get dates to come home with you, but rather the idea of games that result in a score that shows for your work. Allot of old school games did this for competition and getting the high score meant allot more than completing the game and sometimes there was no end but death. How do you feel games like this can succeed in todays gaming world? I have a concept for a game that works in this way. It was inspired by a successful modern game that uses the points score as a foundation for the game, Geometry Wars. Discus...

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Edtharan    607
Score is a method of comparison. Either with your self over several play sessions, or against other players when not in direct conflict (ie: Not player vs Player).

As not all games are multiplayer vs player games, then score gives a good way to compare your performances.

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Kylotan    9880
I like scores. I'm writing a game which may well just give you a single score at the end, which will be compared against that of other players. I don't think everything needs to be 'beatable' or to have a story or anything like that.

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Sneftel    1788
A single-number score is a one-dimensional goal, which doesn't encourage individualized gameplay in an era of increasingly complex games. Moreover, in conjunction with player-paced open-world environments, scores become susceptible to farming.

I see achievements as the renaissance of scores. People get a lot more excited about receiving a "badass driver" award than they do about increasing their score from 829640 to 833130.

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Dekasa    127
Sneftel has a good point, we have (in many games) introduced a different style of point system - rewards, medals, achievements. With the complexity of games, this allows for an accurate, unfarmable 'point' system with relatively little balancing. Players will learn how difficult it is to get super ownage of T-Rex award, and will respect it accordingly, by themselves, no developer needing to spend two weeks trying to balance how many points they get for it. Also, have awards, medals, or achievements in a game practically make mini side-quests themselves. Exceptionally difficult to acquire awards can make a player try for hours to acquire it, adding (a little) to the game.

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firemonk3y    164
I think the topic is more focused upon whether a revival of classic arcade style gameplay would be generally accepted. As far as I'm concerned the genre of games that involve no ultimate goal but beating the other guy's highscore, and addictive gameplay to get you there never actually died. often these games are much simpler to make, which is a definite bonus for indie developers, and as long as your gameplay is good you'll have people screaming for more, which is probably the greatest praise you can receive as a game designer/developer.

To be honest, I love games that have a gripping and involved storyline, games that have a deep overarching purpose. However I also have plenty of times where I think 'sod it, can't be bothered with that' and fire up something like geometry wars or nanaca crash for a spree of addictive and simple gameplay that involves nothing more than continuously destroying alien space ships, or propelling the curled up anime guy as far as I can with a combination of boosts and luck.

I feel that there is still plenty of room for games like this, though, I would also like to see some unique awards in these games for those special moments where you come back from a screen full of baddies where death is seemingly imminent, and other moments where you miraculously dodge fate as you're clicking or button-mashing frantically.

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MSW    151
Quote:

A single-number score is a one-dimensional goal, which doesn't encourage individualized gameplay in an era of increasingly complex games.


Wow! So how does a developer like Treasure stay in buisness? Ikaruga isn't exactly complex now is it?

There is and always will be a nitche for score basied games. SHMUPS (Shoot em Ups) have seen something of a revival over the years largely in Japan, evolveing into manic style "bullet hell" games full of simple yet innovative concepts. Beat-em-ups and 2D fighting games STILL have loyal fans and a community full of innovative homebrew games and utilities. Puzzle games still have a hardcore group of fans. There is still MUCH intrest in these simpler games. ALWAYS WILL BE TOO.

As long as mainstream games remain complex time consumeing endeavors there will still be a need for simpler less consumeing games.

When you get older, have a career, married, with kids...and a mortgage. Sometimes you may find you have two free hours to play a game...and you just don't want to have to retrace everything just to remember where you are and what you are trying to do because its been three weeks sense the last time you fired the game up. Well believe it or not, games like Minesweeper can start to seem MORE appealing than Bioshock at that point.

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Sneftel    1788
Quote:
Original post by MSW
Quote:

A single-number score is a one-dimensional goal, which doesn't encourage individualized gameplay in an era of increasingly complex games.


Wow! So how does a developer like Treasure stay in buisness? Ikaruga isn't exactly complex now is it?

There is and always will be a nitche for score basied games. SHMUPS (Shoot em Ups) have seen something of a revival over the years largely in Japan, evolveing into manic style "bullet hell" games full of simple yet innovative concepts. Beat-em-ups and 2D fighting games STILL have loyal fans and a community full of innovative homebrew games and utilities. Puzzle games still have a hardcore group of fans. There is still MUCH intrest in these simpler games. ALWAYS WILL BE TOO.

As long as mainstream games remain complex time consumeing endeavors there will still be a need for simpler less consumeing games.

When you get older, have a career, married, with kids...and a mortgage. Sometimes you may find you have two free hours to play a game...and you just don't want to have to retrace everything just to remember where you are and what you are trying to do because its been three weeks sense the last time you fired the game up. Well believe it or not, games like Minesweeper can start to seem MORE appealing than Bioshock at that point.

I'm not sure how you got any of all that from my post.

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MSW    151
Quote:
Original post by Sneftel
I'm not sure how you got any of all that from my post.


Lets recap then.

Quote:
A single-number score is a one-dimensional goal, which doesn't encourage individualized gameplay in an era of increasingly complex games (Nope, because its basied on a false premise. Score != goal, score = reward reflecting the degree of game success.)

Moreover, in conjunction with player-paced open-world environments, scores become susceptible to farming (Thats a moot point as most score driven games are mechanic driven rather than sandlot driven.).

I see achievements as the renaissance of scores (Pogo.com agrees with you, to a point. But they are focused on casual gamers; not the hardcore that that keeps Treasure in buisness.)

People get a lot more excited about receiving a "badass driver" award than they do about increasing their score from 829640 to 833130. (The closest analogy with score is wealth or money. In that light would you rather earn that $3490 to have a total $833130? Or do you feel that "badass driver" badge is worth more than $3490?)


The real world isn't binary. Ikaruga can exist along with GTA and Pogo.com. Nothing wrong with that, and there is no reason to change things.

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