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OpenGL I want to start OpenGL but I want to have everything I need.

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Hi, I was going to start OpenGL tonight, but tonight has been time spent on much research in OpenGL what is supported now, what isn't being supported, and the fact that I am working in the Visual C++ "Orcas" Beta 2 Release I knew I would have to do my homework before moving toward OpenGL. First I read the nehe tutorials but was lost when using glaux.h then I read this forum posted here on Gamedev http://www.gamedev.net/community/forums/topic.asp?topic_id=357528 that it is no longer in use, so I thought that the NeHe tutorials are almost out dated, so I decided to go with a book that is of this year using OpenGL OpenGL SuperBible 4, but now I can't find gtools.h It's not in the OpenGL package from either SGI, or MS, and it's definitely not in the source code they give you to look through, and work on. So where is gtools.h or where is a good place to start programming OpenGL using the latest, or Visual C++ 2005 Express Edition? I'm gonna sleep and hope to find help by morning. [edited]I can tell you that I have edited my own include folder inside my Visual Studio VC folder where I do have a gl folder that has gl.h glut.h GLU.h and the respected libraries are in my lib folder, and the respected .DLL are where they should be. Thanks,

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I use and recommend these libraries for OpenGL development:

GLFW for window initialization and input management. This is newer than GLUT and under active development. I also think it's more sensible and lightweight.
GLEW for OpenGL extensions if you want to use any modern GPU features.
SOIL for easy texture loading.

All of these come with precompiled .lib files for Visual C++.

Just start from the most basic GLFW examples, and introduce new things from the NEHE tutorials without copy/pasting the entire code. Specifically use something like SOIL instead of glaux.h for texture loading, and GLEW functionality instead of GLUT for input management and such. It's all well documented on the homepages of these libraries.

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The NeHe tutorials are certainly still of use.
I learned a lot about OpenGL from reading them a couple a years ago.
You just need to replace glaux with some up to date, and preferably non memory leaking, library such as DevIL.

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Quote:
Original post by nife87
The NeHe tutorials are certainly still of use.
I learned a lot about OpenGL from reading them a couple a years ago.
You just need to replace glaux with some up to date, and preferably non memory leaking, library such as DevIL.


I'm sure that most of the things you will learn will be required for the OGL 3.0 also, but just to avoid wasting your time on older things, keep in mind that the new version is going to come out and that you may want to focus on those parts that will be present in the upcoming OGL 3: IIRC most of the extensions will be integrated in the api, the windows version will be updated and fixed functions removed.

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when will OpenGL 3.0 be released. When, and where can I grab it when it does come out, and what do I have to focus on now to make it to where I won't have to learn a new library, or a couple of header files to work with when it does come out?

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If you take a look at my website you will see that you can do quite a bit with OpenGL and a C++ compiler. You don't need any extra libraries. Just the ones that come with Platform SDK.

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Don't worry about OpenGL 3 or newer extensions, you want to learn the basics first anyway. You can do a great deal in immediate mode, without textures, etc. The Red Book is a great place to start and should introduce you to all the fundamentals.

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