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Flash beginner ,where to start ?

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hey i am jus asking for some advice on what to start learning in flash for game programming,thnks :)

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There are several routes you can take with Flash game development. Many people use Adobe Flash CS3, others use Flex Builder and some take a different approach like the HaXe language, which is what I've chosen.

For starters, I'd recommend CS3, as it's relatively easy to get started with. I think Kirupa.com is a good site to get started. However, I've only worked with it for about a month or such, so that's about all I can say about CS3. Good luck. :)

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I'm currently using Flash CS3 for an assignment, although I have another machine with Flash 8 installed as well.

Flash is horrendous unless you're an expert. It is picky, inconsistent, and downright frustrating, no joke. I've been swearing like a trooper all evening because simple things just don't work, no matter how closely you follow the instructions. This is not something you can just pick up by playing with it, you're up shit creek without a paddle unless you start off with tutorials. I've had lectures in it so I know roughly what I'm doing but I'm still finding myself on Google every ten minutes or so because something else has arsed up without explanation. This is the one and only piece of software ever that I have been unable to even attempt to use without a tutorial or help files.

Plus the interface blows; granted Adobe have improved it, but I'm running it at 1440x900 and it still feels horribly cluttered even with all the toolbars hidden. Our lab machines are locked at 1024x768 as well, it's horrible.

You'll have stuff mysteriously leaping around the screen regardless of how your timeline is set up, you'll have mysterious tweens which decide to work in some scenes but not others despite being identical, plus it takes hours of swearing and Googling only to end up with something that looks like utter crap. On top of that, ActionScript doesn't work terribly well unless you're some kind of wizard.

No kidding, I find coding a game from scratch in an actual programming language much easier than using Flash. But it's entirely up to you.

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Well, I don't personally find Flash all that hard myself. I use Flash 8 and I got the book "Flash Game Programming for Dummies." It is really good. After reading through several chapters it was absolutely no problem to whip a game up in a few hours. If you get Flash CS3, the book may be out of date since I think CS3 uses actionscript 3 whcih is different from what the code in the book is written in. I'm sure that there are other books you could get though.

Also, if you have just a little programming knowledge, I find that you can pretty much figure out how to do just about anything by playing around and searching the included help documents. So maybe just play with it and you'll pick it up after several quick tutorials.

As far as web sites, I would recommend:

Gotoandplay.it
flashkit.com
Tutorialized.com (look for the flash tutorials section)
and, Actionscripts.org

~Cody

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Flash (or better, ActionScript) is a higher level language than any other I can think of, and it's Event-oriented rather than object-oriented. This means that the abstraction level is higher and you manipulate only the objects created by you with the graphic editor and the GUI. This also means that implementing the game loop and the on-screen rendering is way easier than in any other language or API. I've worked extensively in Flash and ActionScript, and I've made several games and other things. It's the best way to learn the basics of game programming through experimentation. It does include comprehensive and well documented tutorials and code examples, so don't forget to check them out!

However, don't stick to it too much, since the very nature of Flash hampers its power and potential, so if you are looking forward to make advanced and complex games, just use Flash for learning purposes and then begin descending the ladder of abstraction level toward lower-level languages and API's (I atarted with Flash, then Java, and now I'm working on C++ and DirectX).

Check the documentation and tutorials included in the suite, they are the best tool for starters.

Good Luck!!

PD: Feel free to PM me if you need further help or advice, and don't forget to rate me (if you want to)!

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Quote:
Original post by ukdeveloper
[...]
Those complaints are all your personal preference. I personally agree that the interface is pretty cluttered, but not with the other complaints; I'm not saying your opinion is invalid, just that others may have a different experience, and as the software can be freely trialled there's no harm in someone giving it a shot.

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Quote:
Original post by ukdeveloper
No kidding, I find coding a game from scratch in an actual programming language much easier than using Flash. But it's entirely up to you.

I didn't have so much trouble with CS3, only a few complaints here and there. Anyway, it sounds like HaXe might be interesting to you. Granted, it's more low-level, and it doesn't provide you with a nice vector-art editor, but it's probably more 'natural' for a programmer. You can compile HaXe code into a .swf file, and if you want to generate those too, you can use swfmill. It took me some time to get started with, but now that I've overcome the initial hurdles it's working pretty good for me.


Quote:
Original post by Fighterguard
Flash (or better, ActionScript) is a higher level language than any other I can think of, and it's Event-oriented rather than object-oriented. This means that the abstraction level is higher and you manipulate only the objects created by you with the graphic editor and the GUI. This also means that implementing the game loop and the on-screen rendering is way easier than in any other language or API. I've worked extensively in Flash and ActionScript, and I've made several games and other things. It's the best way to learn the basics of game programming through experimentation. It does include comprehensive and well documented tutorials and code examples, so don't forget to check them out!

However, don't stick to it too much, since the very nature of Flash hampers its power and potential, so if you are looking forward to make advanced and complex games, just use Flash for learning purposes and then begin descending the ladder of abstraction level toward lower-level languages and API's (I atarted with Flash, then Java, and now I'm working on C++ and DirectX).

I agree, and disagree here. ActionScript can be used in an object-oriented way, and you can programmatically create objects - although most users probably won't do it because the GUI encourages a more visual approach. The game-loop and rendering are taken care for by Flash, so it's easier for artists, but less natural for programmers.

Flash can be used for more advanced games just as well, up to a certain level of course. It all depends on what your goal is. There are various people making a decent living on Flash games. Using lower-level languages means you're trading development time for more precise control. However, lower-level languages aren't strictly a requirement to build a good game with. Keep things practical - if you don't need that sort of control, then don't pay the loss of productivity for it. On the other hand, it's good to be familiar with multiple languages, so you can pick the one that best suits a particular problem.

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