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    • By eldwin11929
      We're looking for a Unity (C#) Programmer for our 2D Project. We're looking for a new lead programmer to continue with an existing project.
       
      Project is an open-world RTS, and is very close to a prototyping (playable) phase. Our existing lead, unfortunately, has no more time for the project, and thus we are in search of a new one who is interested.
       
      Game is purely fantasy based, and we'll be able to give you much more detailed info about the project as we begin to work you into it.
       
      You'll be working with our junior developer, who has been here since the beginning.
       
      Primary skills needed are just being able to work within Unity. But skills within XML are also a plus.
       
      Our list of major goals we'd need you to do is minimal, yet still fairly extensive:
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      We have a considerable amount of things done already- however I must warn ahead of time we have quite a bit of unclean code, which may be fairly overwhelming for a new developer on the project.
       
      Let me know your rates per hour, and we'll see if we can work out a good deal between both of us. Royalties are also included.
       
      If interested, send an email to: eldwin11929@yahoo.com
       
      Thanks!
    • By jhocking
      My bestselling and highly recommended Unity book has been fully revised! Unity in Action, Second Edition teaches you to write and deploy games with the Unity game development platform. You'll master the Unity toolset from the ground up, adding the skills you need to go from application coder to game developer.

      Foreword by Jesse Schell, author of The Art of Game Design

      Don't take my word for it being good, look at the sky-high ratings on GoodReads.

      You can order the ebook directly from the publisher's site, or order the book on Amazon to get both the physical book and a coupon to download the ebook!
    • By ThunderTwonk
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      DESCRIPTION FROM GOOGLE PLAY STORE

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      Even death at the end is worth the revenge. 
      Are you brave enough to jump into Tamarra's well?

      Survive from witch attacks, clown attacks and many scary creature.

      - Realistic 3D graphics.
      - Scary sounds.
      - Scary musics.
      - Best experience with headphones.
      - A demon cage where you can imprison all the demons one by one
      - The witches do not like help, but they love blood stone. Witch store where you can develop your abilities and get new abilities.
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      *We do not recommend this game to people with clown phobia, spider phobia, or panic attacks.*

      **!!!**Note : This game is an early-access game, we are upgrading new features every day, new beasts, new improvements, as an example online 1vs1 fall on the list, so stay on connect and follow Halloween : Horror Well on Google Play.**!!!**

    • By INFRA
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Unity Study Major Q: Comp Sci vs Comp Prog

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((If this is the wrong section, sorry.)) I started college last fall at a local community college, majoring in Computer Science. I scored behind, like most CS majors, in the math section and ended up several classes below the "basic" math for the major. I'm now on the second fall semester and it's not going well. Lately I've been having motivation issues with my college studies. I'd lost motivation to study and do things I needed to do for my classes and sort of fell behind in some of them. I've traced the issue to my math class, which is late in the day and really not 'enticing' to me. Math is great and all but it's not something I love to learn about and absorb and things like that. Another class, Computer Architecture, is an interesting course about the PIC16F917 micro controller. Sadly, the teacher has the teaching skills of a lemon, and despite his vast knowledge, he's really...useless. What's worse, is that it is a web class, and is tought through a series of videos he creates. They are, for the most part, even more confusing than I thought the man himself could be. Our 'text book' is the reference manual for the micro controller, which is, naturally, made as a reference material -- something to refresh the memory of someone who is already trained in messing with the controller. While the subject itself is fine, the poor teaching and the overall lack of desire for me to go into such a field leaves me listless and I'm just not getting much out of it. I have decided that on Thursday I'm having my major changed, dropping out of two classes, and going on as a Computer Programming major instead of a Computer Science major. While the loss in 'prestige' is troublesome, I've been told that job prestige is mostly in the eye of the beholder. CS works with more 'abstract' stuff, from what I've read, and I'm thinking more practical programming ability might be more useful in the future. I would like to ask the board if they think I made the right choice? The Computer Programming major requires much less math, and includes a number of classes on Operating Systems and networking that are not part of a Computer Science degree there. I'm still, like most college students, unsure of what I want to 'do' in the future, but have I harmed my job outlook by opting for the "lesser" of the two programs? Game creation is still a plausible hobby for me (still have this RTS concept I think is neat, and will probably talk about that soon) and I think, as far as that goes, I'm not 'missing out' on anything. At least, I don't think. As far as careers in the game industry goes, I don't think that would be something I would do, as I've heard a lot of negativity, and SEEN a lot of bad business practices of late. So what does the board think? M. EDIT: Wow, I forgot we had the alt. libraries forum. :|

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Really, just look at what the courses offer. Computer Science/Software Engineering/Computer Systems are so vague terms that from university to university those meanings change. My full course's name is Bachelor of Applied Science (Computer Science) - that is, it's 95% programming. The first two semesters had one maths subject each, and that was it. Software Engineering is like that but with a focus on development practices. Computer Systems is electronic based. Now, research the courses near you, and pick the one that suits you most. And you're done. Don't worry about titles too much. The industry is inherently vague.

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Quote:
Original post by M Eversberg II
((If this is the wrong section, sorry.))

I started college last fall at a local community college, majoring in Computer Science. I scored behind, like most CS majors, in the math section and ended up several classes below the "basic" math for the major.


Most CS majors are most definitely not flaking out on math. Sorry if you took comfort in that thought.

Quote:
Original post by M Eversberg II
As far as careers in the game industry goes, I don't think that would be something I would do, as I've heard a lot of negativity, and SEEN a lot of bad business practices of late.


What are you referring to here?

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You probably won't end up hurting your career but you may end up hurting yourself.

Back when I went to college (mid-90s - yes I'm old) my thinking was much the same as yours seems to be - take as little math as possible. I took a CS major and my college offered three options for it which were basically the same except for the amount of math you had to take. I opted to take the track with the least amount of math and I regret it now - especially for game programming.

When I'm implementing advanced game algorithms I find myself googling and plugging in code that I don't really understand because I don't have the mathematical background. It's frustrating. I am working to correct it now but as I'm out of college with a full time job and other responsibilities it's a slow process.

In short it hasn't hurt my career (I know how to program and don't need advanced math to do or understand my work) but from an intellectual satisfaction standpoint I'm unhappy and I'd definitely choose differently if I had to do it all over again.

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I am currently going to a college Junior level for Computer Science. We do not have a Computer Programming class because we call it Computer Science and Systems. Right now we have less programming then you would imagine. In the first 2 years you just get your AA like most schools, and in that we were required to only go up to math 124 (common in most schools over here) Or first quarter of Calc, which is pretty easy. Other then that you are usually required to take a few programming classes. Other then that as others said it changes from school to school. Mine has a huge amount of math related classes called Discrete Math which sucks ass! I do not like it because proving proofs and theorems are not my cup of tea.

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Original post by linternet
You probably won't end up hurting your career but you may end up hurting yourself.

Back when I went to college (mid-90s - yes I'm old) my thinking was much the same as yours seems to be - take as little math as possible. I took a CS major and my college offered three options for it which were basically the same except for the amount of math you had to take. I opted to take the track with the least amount of math and I regret it now - especially for game programming.

When I'm implementing advanced game algorithms I find myself googling and plugging in code that I don't really understand because I don't have the mathematical background. It's frustrating. I am working to correct it now but as I'm out of college with a full time job and other responsibilities it's a slow process.

In short it hasn't hurt my career (I know how to program and don't need advanced math to do or understand my work) but from an intellectual satisfaction standpoint I'm unhappy and I'd definitely choose differently if I had to do it all over again.


I do intend to further my math, but mostly through electives.

M.

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I don't think that your choice of major will effect you nearly as much as your choice of school. While a lot of it is overblown, cheaper schools are cheaper for a reason (as you've seen from the poor teaching quality).

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Those looking at your resumes will also take what school you went to way too much into consideration. If you went to a school that cost a total of $100,000, they'll assume that you got a lot better of an education than if it cost $50,000, even if the classes and teachers were the exact same and you did equally as well. Its like if your completely computer-illiterate mom went to buy a new computer, she'd just assume the more expensive one is better. Usually is, but not always, and not always better in the way you intend.

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Original post by Spodi
Those looking at your resumes will also take what school you went to way too much into consideration. If you went to a school that cost a total of $100,000, they'll assume that you got a lot better of an education than if it cost $50,000, even if the classes and teachers were the exact same and you did equally as well. Its like if your completely computer-illiterate mom went to buy a new computer, she'd just assume the more expensive one is better. Usually is, but not always, and not always better in the way you intend.


Agreed. I'm only going to this community college because it's close to my house, and my grant money pays for everything. Figure it would be good for my associates in the least.

M.

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Original post by Spodi
If you went to a school that cost a total of $100,000, they'll assume that you got a lot better of an education than if it cost $50,000, even if the classes and teachers were the exact same and you did equally as well.


I don't think that's true. Certainly if you graduate from a Stanford, MIT, Carnegie-Melon, or one of those prestigious schools it will enhance your resume significantly, but that's only because those schools are known to have solid curricula and an established reputation as some of the leading research institutions in the world. Similarly, schools on the low end--you probably know the ones, or would if you saw them--will potentially hurt you when applying for certain types of jobs.

With the VAST majority of schools, though, a degree is a degree is a degree, and the school is much less important to people than what you accomplished while studying there. Did you do any research? Did you publish? Did you choose advanced electives, maybe a few graduate level courses? Did you participate in relevant clubs (ACM, robotics, etc.)? Did you do any relevant internships or otherwise gain relevant work experience?

Those are the things that matter, not the name of the school. What sets the prestigious schools apart is that they make those opportunities more readily available and EXPECT you to participate in them. There is nothing stopping you from getting that same exposure at a mid-tier school that students might get at MIT or Stanford.

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