Jump to content
  • Advertisement
Sign in to follow this  
Kipple

Graphics for a TBS game

This topic is 4059 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

If you intended to correct an error in the post then please contact us.

Recommended Posts

My team is working on a TBS. We are using PyGame, but are still in the planning phase (read: have not yet written any relevant code). For our graphics engine I see two feasible possibilities: 1. 2D isometric 2. 3D with a fixed isometric perspective I am fixated on the isometric because I don't think we can realistically get a volunteer artist that can do 3D models with animations (we don't have the money to hire one). I have the following two questions: 1. 3D graphics are naturally going to require more work. From your experience, about how much more work? Is it in the ballpark of twice the work (that would be a dealbreaker, I think - we don't have much time as it is) 2. If we go with 2D tiles now, and assuming that we keep coupling to a minimum in our code, is there a possibility we could upgrade to 3D at some later point, or should we just forget about it? Thanks in advance for your time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Advertisement
I can really only take a shot at answering #2.

If you do it right your graphics engine and the rest of your game can be completely separate, meaning a switch isn't too hard. For a simple implementation, the gameplay engine does its own thing; tracking units, combat, resources, etc. Then at the end of your "game loop" your graphics engine draws everything.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
[2D world, 2D units], [2D world, 3D units], [3D world, 2D units], [3D world, 3D units]... all combinations have been used.

As for how much more work they require... hard to tell. It'll require different skills, that's for sure. 2D units need to be drawn from several directions, which needs to happen for every animation frame. 3D units need to be modelled and animated, different points of view add little to no extra work. 2D terrain requires additional work for slopes, 3D terrain can be sculpted, which reduces the amount of textures needed. It's all pretty relative, it depends on the quality you're going for and several other factors. For me it's hard to tell without being in your shoes. ;)

I think it's best to let your artists give it a shot, see what they're most comfortable with. Also, see what's technically the most efficient. You may also consider different approaches, such as modelling units, then taking screenshots of them from various angles (preferrably in an automated way, using a tool like SpriteForge or similar), or stretching tile textures in-game to create slopes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Thanks, guys! We want our game to look professional, so we are very interested in not getting in over our heads. Unfortunately we don't have an artist yet so we have to make these decisions without their input.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

  • Advertisement
×

Important Information

By using GameDev.net, you agree to our community Guidelines, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy.

GameDev.net is your game development community. Create an account for your GameDev Portfolio and participate in the largest developer community in the games industry.

Sign me up!