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development tools for C++

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Hi all: I am just turning my body from Microsoft to the open source world. Just a silly question that what kind of tools do you use to write C++ programs under Linux? Is Ecllipse the best choice? Or even if you have any other better options? I really don't like command line compiletions. Any good suggestions please? Also, what kind of mathematical scientific library do you prefer? Thanks

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Most Linux distributions will include the gcc compiler (invoked on the Terminal; I've used it for compiling small programs with two or three source files and it worked great).

There's also the absolutely hideous KDevelop that comes with KDE - last time I used it, it was truly terrible and was capable of basically nothing, but that was ages ago so it must have improved since then.

I'd avoid Eclipse for anything other than Java. For all its multi-language, user friendly propaganda, it was a total pain in every orifice trying to get it to work with anything other than Java. Even following the official instructions to the absolute letter was a no dice situation, it just wasn't for doing it and I had this problem with PHP and C++ even with all the required gizmos downloaded and installed, just a sea of error messages and total frustration for me. Don't get me wrong, it's absolutely great for Java but piss poor for everything else unless you have the patience of Jesus to get it all set up and working.

I've never used Code::Blocks but I've heard more than enough good things about it, so it's definitely worth a try.

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Thanks ukdeveloper. It's really great advice.

So as you said the gcc compiler is great for small programs, then what compiler would be your choice for a large project? Basically that's really the thing prevent me from using Linux because in Visual Studio building a large project is natural and I only need to concentrate on programming rather than compiletion.

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Quote:
Original post by ukdeveloper
Most Linux distributions will include the gcc compiler (invoked on the Terminal; I've used it for compiling small programs with two or three source files and it worked great).

Yeah most Linux IDEs use gcc for actual compilation. Unless I'm working on a remote machine, though I prefer an IDE if a good one exists.

Quote:
Original post by ukdeveloper
There's also the absolutely hideous KDevelop that comes with KDE - last time I used it, it was truly terrible and was capable of basically nothing, but that was ages ago so it must have improved since then.

Yeah I don't recommend KDevelop either. It feels so bloated for what it gives you.


Quote:
Original post by ukdeveloper
For all its multi-language, user friendly propaganda, it was a total pain in every orifice trying to get it to work with anything other than Java. Even following the official instructions to the absolute letter was a no dice situation, it just wasn't for doing it and I had this problem with PHP and C++ even with all the required gizmos downloaded and installed, just a sea of error messages and total frustration for me.

Yeah I didn't want to mention it because I really didn't try to hard, but I also couln't get Eclipse to work. I tried for C++ and Ocaml, but without luck. I think it's just so different from other IDE's that it was thoroughly non-intuitive and I didn't want to spend that long learning how it works.

Code::Blocks is definitely the best I've found for C++. For all other languages, I fall back on gvim and command line tools.

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I have yet to see GCC actually fail at something performance-wise. I mean, my Gentoo box was compiled from scratch using GCC, and its super fast (we're talking an entire OS compiled using GCC, so that must mean something!).

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So what's your guys opinions of using GCC to build a larger project rather than only 2 or 3 files?

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Completely useless. Use some kind of makefile system to call GCC for you, otherwise you will drive yourself insane within a matter of minutes.

"make" itself is servicable, although I find it obtuse and archaic. I liked SCons. Assuming you're not using an IDE, of course, because the IDE typically generates makefiles for you.

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Quote:
Original post by Asuralm
So what's your guys opinions of using GCC to build a larger project rather than only 2 or 3 files?


I use GCC to build my game (a lot more than 2 or 3 files) on Windows. It works fine.

Quote:

Completely useless. Use some kind of makefile system to call GCC for you, otherwise you will drive yourself insane within a matter of minutes.

"make" itself is servicable, although I find it obtuse and archaic. I liked SCons. Assuming you're not using an IDE, of course, because the IDE typically generates makefiles for you.


I assume the OP was not talking about invoking it manually.

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OK Asuralm in case you're confused.

There is a difference between an IDE and a compiler. The compiler just compiles and links your sources into an executable. The IDE lets you edit your code and gives it to the compiler for you. On Windows, IDEs usually come with compilers since Windows has no standard compiler that it ships with.

On Linux, the standard compiler is gcc which pretty much everyone has and pretty much everyone uses. Most C++ IDE's for Linux don't include a compiler at all and just use gcc.

The makefile systems jpetrie is talking about are essentially shortcuts that allow you to invoke the compiler with one command and have it only compile the files it needs to. All IDEs do this somehow too.

I'd recommend learning how to use make even if you never plan to use it seriously, as it is often used for installing libraries on Linux.

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Thanks Simian Man. That's really helpful. I know a little bit about makefile. It always comes with lots of cumbersome flags and options. I really hate those things. But hopefully I will be enjoying the powerful open source when I used to it.

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Ehrm, there's also the NetBeans IDE and it's C/C++ Development Pack. It was a pain setting it up, never really used it much so I can't say much else.

I use Code::Blocks and I'd recommend it. Just remember to download the nightly build not the Release Candidate.

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