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Take calculus or discreet math?

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I need to pick a math course of next semester and I'm wondering which is more useful for game programming, calculus or discreet math? Can someone let me know?

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Take both, but I'd suggest taking calculus first. Although discrete mathematics is geared more towards computer science, calculus is more fundamental and is applicable to many subjects you'll need as a game developer (physics, AI, etc.)

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Calculus has more useful applications. Discreet is... kinda neat, but not very useful to a programmer. I guess you'd learn some notations that would help you translate math-y pdfs into working code.

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Discrete math gives you the mathematical foundation for handling computer science topics that you will face as a cs major. Having a firm grasp of inductive proofs is probably a good idea when taking a class like that, although it is not necessary but it makes things easier. You basically will need parts of discrete math for courses in algorithm analysis, logic in cs formal languages and automata etc. I will say that unless you intend on doing computer science as a major it is not crucial to take discrete mathematics except from more of an academic pursuit in itself. If you can do both then that is clearly good, but if you had to choose just one or the other I would personally vote in favor of calculus if you just want to do game programming.

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I agree with what Imtiaz says.

In my opinion discreet math is 10 times as challenging as calculus. Then again I can apply math all day, but when it comes to proving the theorems, thats is a whole different ball game.

To paraphrase my professor: "Calculus is not real math". Essentially he is saying calculus in college is applying math. The proofs of the concepts of calculus is the real math. I hate to say it but I am starting to agree with him.

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Take Calculus first, then take it up to Calculus 3, and then take linear algebra afterwards take discrete math. Math is not challenging it's just you finding time to work on problems no matter how long it may take you to figure them out.

I say take all the math classes you can; it's good for ya!

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Quote:
Original post by coden4fun
Take Calculus first, then take it up to Calculus 3, and then take linear algebra afterwards take discrete math.

I recommend you take Linear Algebra as soon as you can. It's the type of subject that you don't fully digest until a couple of years after you take it, and if you learned it well you'll use it everywhere.

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Quote:
Original post by smc
In my opinion discreet math is 10 times as challenging as calculus.


Interesting that you say that. Discrete math is a lower math level than calculus in my school so that implies that it's easier. Anyways, I'll do the calculus first. Thanks alot!

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Quote:
Original post by alvaro
Quote:
Original post by coden4fun
Take Calculus first, then take it up to Calculus 3, and then take linear algebra afterwards take discrete math.

I recommend you take Linear Algebra as soon as you can. It's the type of subject that you don't fully digest until a couple of years after you take it, and if you learned it well you'll use it everywhere.


It all depends on how well of a math student you are, and how well you work with problems personally. If you think more abstract, or more concrete. I don't think you can throw a black/white solution to this idea of when to take linear algebra. I can only say to take calculus first since it's a prerequisite; however, the more math you have under your belt the more comfortable you'll be working on difficult problems, and using your imagination and your knowledge to solve problems.

There are so many courses in the field of Mathematics that I have had, and so so many more that I have left to take. In honesty I was suggest if you want to become a really good programmer where you make games for a living, and you enjoy taking math then as you're getting your degree in computer science get the highest degree you can get in the field of Mathematics.

I must say that once you reach a certain level in mathematics it is essentially just learning new steps and applying steps you've already learned to recognize patterns to solve problems, but not all math problems are just about recognizing patterns critical thinking, and finding ways to get your solution is a must as well.

Oh, I'm gonna work on some math right now triple integrals anyone?

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I say take as much math as possible as long as you stay sane enough to take it...Cuz some those math dudes are a little nuts... HAHA. I'm kidding. I doubled majored in math and computer science. I find both theoretical and applied mathematics are really important in game programming. I love math it's just I suck really bad at it hehe. I know because most of my class mates were some really serious math dudes and are really good at it (naw they were just super smart and hardworking).

Again, if you are offended by me calling you nuts you crazy math dude I'm a nut too!

And one more thing, when you do take these math classes don't get lazy. Don't be a jackass until you realize it's too late and you wish you paid more attention in earlier classes. Slacking off is not cool. I learned my lesson.

Also I think anyone can do it, as long as you put in the hard work. If they can train me in math, anyone can be trained in it.




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