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FlamingTeddiz

Creating a 3d game, looking for some basic knowledge

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I am trying to create a 3d game. I need a little help getting started. This is my theory for making the game. I will need one or more engines such as graphics, physics, audio, ... anything else that is complex. I dont really care about audio right now so I have two engines (which are basically libraries of functions and methods). I am using Ogre for graphics and rendering. I am using True Axis for physics and collisions. I will need to link a shape / object made in Ogre with a geometric shape in True Axis to get the physics working on that object. example, I can make a ragdol mesh and texture it with Ogre, I will then somehow link that ragdol or make an instance of the shape/polygons to True Axis and make collisions run through that engine. Is this right? am I on the right track for making a 3d game? Thanks.

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It sounds like you have everything but do you have dedication and the programming skills? I learned this the hard way. I thought I could sit down and write an awesome 3D game. If your going for '3D Q*bert meets pac-man' you're set and go on! If your trying to write the next best commercial game such as 'Haloid, the story of a space cyborg and metroids' then I hope you know about quaternions, physics, several forms of collision detection, and many more. I'm actually working on a 3D game with a few other people, we haven't even gotten into the battle system yet. We're still implementing the ability to load models, physics, and more. It takes time and dedication. Sometimes we hit a wall in coding, and we come here for help. Make sure you know what you need to know for the game you are making. This, along with the right tools, you are good to go! Type away! Most importantly, have fun!

~PCN

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Start off by learning to use your 3d library. Get to the stage where you can write a function to draw a textured triangle on the screen.

Then learn to load models from disk and display them.

At this point you will be ready for that physics system you mentioned. Don't try to write your own because it will take you years. Knowing this would have saved me six months of wasted time. Instead, use a free physics library such as bullet. Get the hang of using your chosen physics library, and rendering the results on screen using your renderer.

Once you have the ability to make objects interact with each other, you can make your first complete 3d game. But, before you do anything else,
read this. I believe this is good advice. My thanks to the author.
Having this three years ago would have saved me a year of wasted time.

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Thanks for the feedback. I have changed my mind though to make a 2d rpg of sorts using the XNA framework for c#. Its a good starter language / pack and I already have made 2d games with Python so I wont have to tackle 3d just yet. If anyones familiar I'm using the Farseer physics engine and the Mercury - Skinakas particle engine.

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Unless you want your game to turn into a big mess of spaghetti you should really have 1 game engine that incorporates all of sound, graphics, physics, file loading, etc. To make a game all these things need to be integrated, and its better to encapsulate that integration inside an engine than to have to manage all the interwoven strings inside your game programming. This doesn't mean you cannot use Ogre or PhysX or whatever...I just suggest that your game engine encapsulate these other "engines" that you might better think of as simply "libraries."

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Is that what your engine looks like? I use objects linked together by pointers during initialization. Then, I simply call the member functions of a few classes and they go about updating the rest.

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