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Hard for you to understand

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I was wondering what part of coding or the programing language was difficult for you to understand? i remember not being able to understanding how the CPU flags work in 6502 asm. I also had problems with indirect access (for the guys who know it, ADC ($44),Y & ADC ($44, x)). With vb6 i had problems understand and using variables passed into functions (byval & byref).

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Actually, 6502's instruction set is probably the neatest ever (in terms of simplicity and beauty :)), though I've never found a proper use for the ($mm,x) addressing mode. Ok, back to the question... The most difficult part (or should I say method?) for me would be dynamic programming. In fact I've only seen two problems solved with this method, and both were kind of difficult to follow, yet one of those did make a little bit of sense. :)

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I haven't used VB6 for long time, but I could tell you that
passing ByVal mean you pass your variable by its value to the
function. ByRef mean you pass your variable by its address not
by its value. For example:


Function Test(ByVal A)
A = 10
End Function

Function Test1(ByRef A)
A = 10
End Function

Sub Form_Load()
Dim Result As Integer
Result = 5
Test(Result)
MsgBox(Result)
Test1(Result)
MsgBox(Result)
End Sub


The first message box will display "5"
The second message box will display "10"

Sorry for my dreadful english but I hope you understand
what I mean. and sorry if there is any mistake in my code
because I haven't for programming in VB6 for ages.


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I'm currently having hard time with IA32 assembly. I need to learn it for university.

Sadly the classes are not about assembly but about computer architecture, so i must know about how commands are interpreted, what exactly happens at the time in processor and such. Just recently we started analyzing how commands are constructed in binary code.

The good side is, that when you know how to program in machine code(i just hope that we won't have to learn that) there is nothing harder to come anymore :)

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The only thing I find difficult at the beginning is learning a completely new programming paradigm.
It's not that much of an issue switching between object-oriented and procedural programming as it is going into purely functional programming for the first time.
My first contact with Haskell made me rethink my usual approach on problem solving completely, which even helped me finding more elegant solution on non-functional languages.

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I think the hardest part for me was just getting used to how the programs worked and flowed. I understood all the syntax, but it took a little while for me to see how you make everything work together I guess. It's kind of hard to explain.

Oh yeah, and pointers. I didn't understand them at first so I saw no need for them. Then about a year after I first read about them, I went back and reread the section about them, and everything just clicked.

Svenjamin

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Quote:
Original post by Cybernator
Actually, 6502's instruction set is probably the neatest ever (in terms of simplicity and beauty :)), though I've never found a proper use for the ($mm,x) addressing mode. Ok, back to the question... The most difficult part (or should I say method?) for me would be dynamic programming. In fact I've only seen two problems solved with this method, and both were kind of difficult to follow, yet one of those did make a little bit of sense. :)


Haha, it is. The 6502 was very nice =)

What do you mean exactly by "dynamic programming"?
Your not talking about putting asm in ram then jumping to it? : O. haha, i am sure this is not what you mean. (if it is, then thats pure evil and there should be a non dynamic way to solve it)

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Quote:
Original post by EccentricSight
What do you mean exactly by "dynamic programming"?


One of basic optimization algorithms.

It's a formal method of storing intermediate results to reduce running times of certain problems.

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Ah, forgot the DP version of Fibonacci. :) It that case it's not DP in general. I was referring to the basic 0/1 knapsack problem (the one which did make some sense), and the longest common subsequence problem (which gave me some hard time).

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Quote:
Original post by EccentricSight
Your not talking about putting asm in ram then jumping to it? [...]
[...] thats pure evil and there should be a non dynamic way to solve it


"Putting" as in "generating"? It is, really, the best way of speedcode (unrolled loops) compression. I don't consider it evil since speedcode follows a well defined pattern. But then again, we are talking about the "glory" days here. :) Things are pretty much different today.

Oops, going off-topic. :)

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Quote:
Original post by ToohrVyk
The ASP.NET 2.0 postback propagation system, and the reason why ML derivatives always use monomorphic unification for mutually recursive functions.


Show-off. :)

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I initially learned programming on my own so I had a rough time using good practices when I started school. I got mad a lot when my programs worked right and I lost points for stuff like indentation, lack of comments, lack of classes or functions etc. I didn't really understand the point until I started working on teams, and now I won't even touch code that isn't organized.

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Actually I get along pretty well with new paradigms... It's the small details I agonize over - Best practices, making it right and perfect on the first time, understanding FLOWS.
The most recent example is my utter failure at self teaching myself C openGL... So many function calls to set up the framework, and if you omit you'll get a duck instead of a sphere... I hope pyOpengl will make it easier.
The only flows of actions I like are of course the one's I make up / implement :).

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Quote:
Original post by EccentricSight
I was wondering what part of coding or the programing language was difficult for you to understand?

i remember not being able to understanding how the CPU flags work in 6502 asm. I also had problems with indirect access (for the guys who know it, ADC ($44),Y & ADC ($44, x)).

With vb6 i had problems understand and using variables passed into functions (byval & byref).



You mean it gets easier?

I still "struggle" with it every day. There's always something I "just don't get".

One thing I distinctly remember was parameter passing. For some reason I just didn't understand the list of parameters for a method and what to do with them.

My current struggle is XML Serilization in C#. I've been staring at a few examples, and they sorta make sense, but I don't go very deep yet with my knowledge.

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