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Maths Books for the Not-So-Mathematical

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Okies. A quick look around didn't show what I wanted, so here goes. I would like to know an advisable math book for someone such as myself. I have what I consider a decent grasp on algebra, if not somewhat intermediate(possibly). I know basic, elementary calculus. Since I'm not going to college at the moment, I'm trying to improve myself in, mainly, computer science through self study. However, after stumbling through the very end of section 1.1 in Knuth's "Art of Computer Programming", and since section 1.2 is starting to look quite daunting, I figure I need to discipline myself in maths. I find math quite interesting, but mostly in stuff that I 'discover', mainly small things already known. I get quite bored and in the past haven't disciplined myself with 'school maths' where you learn a concept then apply it to abstract situations, etc. But occasions have arisen where I regered not having paid more attention to what appeared to be doldrum. Digressing aside, I would like decent teach-yourself math books suggested, if at all possible. I'm tempted to get Knuth(and other authors)'s "Concrete Mathematics", but since I'm low on funds, don't want to spend a bunch of money on something that is currently too much for me. On the other hand, I don't want something to easy and/or babyfied(i.e., basic algebra). If you know what I mean. :/ So, thanks in advance, and apologies if something similiar has already been addressed. [Edit: CALCULUS, NOT MATHEMATICS!]

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If you get patterns well, I'd suggest getting a Precal book, followed by a Calculus book.

If your Algebra is lacking, Precal will bring you into shape and straighten up your logically style and thinking. The jump from plugging and solving for numbers to analysis, which is the branch of math Calculus is in, can be VERY confusing if you don't have a good abstract understanding of math.

I'd also recommend that you find someone online to help teach you. There are many details that are hard to comprehend, and often you'll need a clarification to how the system works.

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"What is Mathematics?"(link to Amazon) by Courant/Robbins/Stewart is very good. It's not solely about calculus (there is a lot about geometry, number theory and other topics too) but has several chapters about or related to it. Very accessible, but not dumbed down.

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You don't need maths books - this is the internet age!

Check out these videos, they cover everything up to pre-calc.

http://www.mathtutor.ac.uk/viewdisks.php

(The disks are online and are free to view)

I am in the same boat as you and have been using the book Trigonometry and Geometry for Calculus (part of the Selby series), but the internet learning videos seem to visually stick in my head better and complement any book...

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Internet Age it may be, but I still have dial-up.

I'll give the books above mentioned a look-see. I found a bunch of "For Dummies" and "Idiots Guide" that are quite inexpensive, but not sure how well they cover the material, so the above will probably be a big help.

Thankies!

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For calculus I recommend Thompson's book, "Calculus Made Easy" (edited by Martin Gardener). Although written in 1915, not much has changed since ;). It was the book I learned calculus from just before university. Its motto is: what one fool can do, another can as well. Very humorous and yet very very well written.

Good luck, and come back & ask questions if you get stuck :).

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http://mathworld.wolfram.com/Quaternion.html is the best site.

If the above is too difficult, sosmath.com would work as well.

There are also multiple books on internet, thought some are hard to read.

http://www.math.gatech.edu/~cain/textbooks/onlinebooks.html is one site to look at.

http://www.freetechbooks.com/forum-38.html is another directory of sites.

BTW writting programs to try concepts is much better than learning them from books.

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