Sign in to follow this  

C++ beginner

This topic is 3663 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

If you intended to correct an error in the post then please contact us.

Recommended Posts

Hi everyone. I began learning python about a year ago but for some reason i just stopped learning all together after a few weeks. Its not because I lost interest but more because of my spare time. Well now Ive decided to commit myself to learning to program because of my love of video games. This time around I really think I wanna go the C++ route. Im starting college in september and I am going to be Pre-med, but im sure that I wanna major in Computer science so Id love to get a head start in programming. Can anyone suggest the best compilers i should use, also the best possible material from which I can learn C++, whether it be online lessons or books.Also tell me everything I will need on my computer in order to write and run C++ code. Keep in mind im starting pretty much from scratch because I never got too far into Python so I need to learn from the bottom.. thank you

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I recommend the book "Beginning C++ Game Programming" by Michael Dawson. I taught myself C++ using only that book and the internet. It's an awesome book for people just starting out, plus I use it as a reference book all the time to make sure I have a specific type of syntax right.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
whats the difference between express and regular, because I know the regular version is a few hundred dollars. I was lookin at Dev C++ but id rather have the microsoft program if its free and has everything I need. Also I was looking at the book, C++ Primer 4th edition. I was wondering if anyone who knows about it recommends it to a beginner like me

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The Express editions do not support all of the features in the full versions. There are differences between the 2008 and 2005 uh.. differences, but for the most part they are the same. There is a comparison chart available here. I know that the express edition of Visual C++ now allows you to install the 'platform sdk' at the same time as the IDE instead of separately.

Basically, for beginners and a large number of amateur developers it is incredibly unlikely that they will need any of the functionality not present in the express editions.

There are no license restrictions placed on users of the Express Editions (at least, not more than the other editions). You can sell your software as you please.

You DO NOT want devc++. If you don't want the microsoft compilers use Code::Blocks or even wxDevC++ (an offshoot of the defunct devc++).

Also, unless you really insist on wanting to 'start' with c++, I would suggest C# instead. Or find out what language your chosen college uses and Pick A Different One. You've almost 10 months until school so you should be able to get a good amount of knowledge on programming concepts. But it's also good to learn more than one language so if your school 'introduces' you to C# then picking (C++, Python, Java, Lisp, Ruby, Haskell, Lisp, Prolog, Smalltalk, Ada, Cobol, assembly, brainf*ck, machine language, etc) to learn now you will you broaden your horizons sooner rather than later. After all, it's the concepts that are important, not the syntax.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Well as far as college goes I have no idea where Im going so Im not going to build my learning around that. I just want to be pointed in the right direction to learn how to program in C++ from the ground up. Im completely new with only very minimal knowledge of programming... I mean very little knowledge. I remember some basics of Python but thats it. I want to learn how to program in C++ with the hope of eventually creating games with it. Of course I know that games are a completely different evil and I need to be able to create simple console programs first. So please give me any advice on how I should go about learning this stuff.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Well i downloaded visual c++ 2008 express and watched the tutorial on how to use it. Its alot more complicated that my old Python IDE but i guess the added functions will help when I become more advanced. So now can anyone recommend online or book resourses that can teach me how to program in C++. I need something aimed at a beginner who is learning C++ as a first language. Any help would be greatly appreciated because Id like to start learning as soon as possible

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Many will hesitate to direct you to a tutorial simply because there is no substitute for a decent book.

Tutorials often have the flaw that they only show you one solution to the given problem, and then you fall into the "there is only one way of solving this, and if I can't solve it this way then there's nothing to do about it"-pit, which many programmers struggle to get out of once they move on.

There are TONS of books on C++, but one of the most popular one moves at a very fast pace. 'Everyone' says their current book is great, and my great fear of not being mainstream leads me to post this link:
http://vig.prenhall.com/catalog/academic/product/0,1144,0136152503,00.html

This is what I've been using this semester, and I find it a very thorough and complete introduction to C++, and it also has a nice extra addition of gameprogramming with the Ogre library.

It is expencive, but in my eyes worth it if you really want to follow this path.


Best of luck. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I strongly suggest that you stick with Python. You will go a lot farther in the next 10 months learning Python than you will learning C++. You can write games in Python.

Forgive my ignorance, I know nothing about pre-med. I am curious. What do computer science and video games have to do with pre-med? Is computer science a normal thing to do for pre-med?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by biggjoee5790
Well as far as college goes I have no idea where Im going ... I just want to be pointed in the right direction to learn how to program in C++ from the ground up. ... Of course I know that games are a completely different evil and I need to be able to create simple console programs first. So please give me any advice ...


Hi, Im currently in college (4th year) now in computer and electrial engineering, the programs that I have used at URI are eclipse and Microsoft Visual Studio .Net. I found that eclipse was very hard to learn at first but once confortable with it is was extreamly easy run. I had use Visual Studio .Net before in programming C++ classes and used Text Pad with Java. So I would say get a compiler that you want to use for functionallity (eclipse is free) compile for unix, linx, windows. Then learn the aspects of the compiler. As for programming get one or two concepts books and then just get a basic book for C++. It was said before concepts are better than just the language of C++, I'll reinforce that again!!! Most classes are taught in pseudo (spelling) code, then you write your own code for the type of compiler you have. So this makes every one have there own distinct flavor for what you write and type of comiler you use. I recommend get something free off the internet and just start using that nothing fancy becuase once you get in some classes you will either buy a book with a compiler in it or download one for class.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by JohnBolton
I strongly suggest that you stick with Python. You will go a lot farther in the next 10 months learning Python than you will learning C++. You can write games in Python.

Forgive my ignorance, I know nothing about pre-med. I am curious. What do computer science and video games have to do with pre-med? Is computer science a normal thing to do for pre-med?


Well let me explain.. pre-med is just simply taking all of the necessary courses that are required to be admitted into medical school. The classes (Biology, Organic Chem, Inorganic Chem, Physics, Anatomy, Etc) can all be taken as minors in your 4 years of undergrad school. Pre-med isnt actually a major. Although many people who are planning to go to medical school major in bio or chem, you can major in anything you want. I know doctors who majored in english, history, and even classic literature lol. You can major in anything you like, as long as after your 4 years, you have all the necessary science credits that your future med school requires. After meeting with many advisors, they recommended that I major in something that I enjoy and that I can keep a high average in. Taking Bio as a major would be very tedious, and on top of a 4 year bio major i would still have to take all those science minors, which would make it hard for me to keep a high GPA. By majoring in computer science, I will be learining something that really interests me and something that Im sure I will accel at. And the great part about it is that at the end of my 4 years I will have 2 options... continue to medical school, or use my bachelors degree in comp science and continue down that road. Hope that answered ur question :)

as far as stickin to Python goes, Im not sure. Ya I can already tell it is easier than c++ but I feel like Im sorta cheatin myself by not learnin c++. I feel like I should take the extra challenge and learn something that will be more valuble in the long run. I dunno it just makes sense to me. maybe im totally wrong

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by biggjoee5790as far as stickin to Python goes, Im not sure. Ya I can already tell it is easier than c++ but I feel like Im sorta cheatin myself by not learnin c++. I feel like I should take the extra challenge and learn something that will be more valuble in the long run. I dunno it just makes sense to me. maybe im totally wrong


As long as I know, python is an excellent language to design and construct softwares. I would not think python is less valuable than C++ just because of its easiness in syntax and structure(although it is true that C++ is more widely used in the industry.)

The best advice I can give you is to go grab a C++ book right now(either one of those books mentioned above,) and come back when you have a question with the language. Too much planning sometimes make you exhausted even before you jump into the actual game.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
well that 1st book is too expensive.. 100 bucks is alot for a book. I was lookin at the tutorials at http://www.cprogramming.com/tutorial.html#c++tutorial
and was wondering whether that was a good startin place. I just wanna make sure I learn the correct and best way possible. There has to be some really good resource for a beginning programmer to learn C++

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by biggjoee5790
as far as stickin to Python goes, Im not sure. Ya I can already tell it is easier than c++ but I feel like Im sorta cheatin myself by not learnin c++. I feel like I should take the extra challenge and learn something that will be more valuble in the long run. I dunno it just makes sense to me. maybe im totally wrong

I would recommend you stick with Python even though it seems like you are cheating yourself but you aren't. Programming is more of a thought process than the actual syntax. With Python you learn the thought process and the Python syntax. So when you learn a new language, ex. C++, you just have to learn the syntax. Plus Python makes it easier to learn the thought process than C++. I also started with Python and made 2d games with Pygame. Now I'm at C++ and it is not as hard.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
so you really think I should continue to learn python?? maybe it does make sense to do that... I just want to make sure that in the end I will be able to do everything I want to do with programming such as 2d and 3d games. Also If I wanna learn c++ after being good at python, your sayin it wont be like startin over again? Also will i be able to learn opengl or direct3d programming with python?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by biggjoee5790
so you really think I should continue to learn python?? maybe it does make sense to do that... I just want to make sure that in the end I will be able to do everything I want to do with programming such as 2d and 3d games. Also If I wanna learn c++ after being good at python, your sayin it wont be like startin over again? Also will i be able to learn opengl or direct3d programming with python?

I would recommend it. Programming is taken in baby steps. You have to learn one little thing at a time. Before you can make 2d and 3d games you must first make console games, which are text based. Then you can eventually move to 2d and then 3d. After you become good at Python, learning C++ will not take long. As for OpenGL on Python, there is PyOpenGL but I haven't used it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This topic is 3663 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

If you intended to correct an error in the post then please contact us.

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this