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hi, ive barely started to learn c++, but i wondered if working in the game industry in a big company like Nintendo or Ubisoft is a realistic goal if i work hard enough, or if i should consider any game development i go on to do as a hobby. Bu the way, if i ever go to university, i plan to study a subject like compter science or mathematics. I would also like to know if living in the uk would make any problems about working in the games industry. Thanks in advance for any help!

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If you don't mind me asking, how old are you? (If you're under 13, just say 13 because GDNet has a legal responsibility to not keep details of under 13s :P) The main thing about getting into the games industry is building up a portfolio of stuff. Nowhere is going to take someone on who doesn't know C++ (Or whatever language is being used) and be willing to spend years teaching them it. Don't worry so much about specific APIs or even 3D stuff to start with, once your familiar with a few APIs, it's easy to pick up others.

And being in the UK isn't a problem at all, there's pleanty of developers in the UK (I work for Firebrand Games in Glasgow).

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Original post by trivium_guy95
hi, ive barely started to learn c++, but i wondered if working in the game industry in a big company like Nintendo or Ubisoft is a realistic goal if i work hard enough,

Yes? I mean, how do you think the programmers who work at those companies got there?
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or if i should consider any game development i go on to do as a hobby.

No one can answer that but you.
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Bu the way, if i ever go to university, i plan to study a subject like compter science or mathematics.

You probably won't get a programming job without a CS degree, so doing so would definitely be a good idea. I would recommend taking some writing classes as well.
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I would also like to know if living in the uk would make any problems about working in the games industry.

Why would it? There are quite a few game studios and publishers in the UK.
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Thanks in advance for any help!

No problem. I'm procrastinating at work [wink]

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yh.. im 15 so dont worry hehe

also i understand i need good skills - i cant just jump staright in - i plan to spend so time learning while im still in school

Also, to be more specific on my main question, its like my sort of dream to work for one of my favourite game companies, so i wanted to know if getting into a big company is extremely unlikely or could happen if i put in the work

thanks

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If you hone your skills to be a relatively talented programmer then no, you won't have a problem with eventually working for a big name company. Don't expect it right off the bat, but paying your dues at a smaller company for awhile will help considerably.

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ok thanks for the advice!

Am i right in thinking that a computer science degree would be fine, i dont need a game specific qualification?

I also was wondering what happens to the titles smaller companies make... do they get released on the succesful consoles.. im not really sure:S

Thanks again, ive been inspired to become the best game developer i can hopefully ill be with nintendo one day XD

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Quote:
Original post by trivium_guy95
Am i right in thinking that a computer science degree would be fine, i dont need a game specific qualification?

Your game specific qualification comes from actually making games. A regular old CS degree coupled with games that you have made, hopefully with others in team based productions. Showing team experience is a biggie as well as your ability to finish a game. Don't make tech demos, make games.

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I also was wondering what happens to the titles smaller companies make... do they get released on the succesful consoles.. im not really sure:S

This is kind of a weird question. A lot of times smaller companies will release games on the last generation of consoles, like the PS2 and Xbox instead of the PS3 or 360. The handheld market is big for smaller companies because of the drastically lower overhead as compared to console games.

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Thanks again, ive been inspired to become the best game developer i can hopefully ill be with nintendo one day XD

I would certainly hope that posts by two random guys on a forum aren't the inspiration you need. Oh, and don't hold out for programming for Nintendo, because you're not Japanese. All of Nintendo's first party games are well, made in Japan. I make games for the Nintendo Wii and DS (and I think Evil Steve does too), but neither of us actually work FOR Nintendo.

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No, those smaller companies are going to want to see team experience as well. The whole solo coding warrior doesn't fly inside of a game studio. You need to be able to work together and companies like to see that you have experience doing so. You will need to take it upon yourself to get together with friends, classmates, whatever and make games.

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I also would like to add that the smaller companies also look at digital channels of distribution such as Steam, Xbox Live and maybe WiiWare. For example, Introversion (a company that only has 3 people) made Uplink, Darwinia and Defcon are primary using the Steam distribution network to sell their games. Jeff Minter developed Space Giraffe for Xbox Live primary by himself.

There are plenty of big name companies in the UK such as EA, Codemasters and Traveller Tales so don't worry about your location.

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