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issue of gpled g++ and its use to compile games

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I was simply wondering whether using g++, (the c++ compiler of the gcc) which is under the gpl, with boost c++ libraries (which are allowed to be distributed with proprietary programs) could be used to create proprietary software. I have sadly not found anything which clearly says whether the gcc can be used to compile a proprietary project. I understand that since libraries are distributed with the compiled program, using the gnu c library is out of the question. But I am still not sure if I can only use gcc as a compiler to create a proprietary program. Thanks! tl;dr = can g++ be used with boost c++ libraries to create a proprietary piece of software?

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Okay, cool. But just out of curiosity could you also post a reference to somewhere that proves that? All of my google searching has left me only with blogs and forum posts (much like this one) and nothing really concrete. Thanks!

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Disclaimer: I Am Not A Lawyer.

Quote:
Original post by lycaonos
I understand that since libraries are distributed with the compiled program, using the gnu c library is out of the question.

Not at all. If you statically link glibc then you must also distribute object code for your application such that a user can re-link your application with any equivalent implementation of the Standard C Library, but you are not required to distribute source code. Alternatively if you dynamically link to glibc then you do not even need to distribute object code, provided the user is able to use an interface-compatible copy of glibc of their choice. LGPL 2.1 Section 6

Using libstdc++ is even easier since it is licensed under LGPL with the runtime exception, which lifts all restrictions on programs which use the library.libstdc++ license

Σnigma

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Okay, well thank you enigma. I think I am gonna go do a bit more research into this and actually read the licenses for boostc++ and libstdc++ libraries. Thanks!

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You are free to use the gcc compiler to create proprietry programs; programs you create using gcc are entirely yours, and not derivatives of gcc.

The GNU C library is under the GNU Lesser GPL, which explicitly says that you may use it to create proprietry programs.

libstdc++ is GPL with a special exception which states using libstdc++ to make a program does not cause any license restrictions. See [url]http://gcc.gnu.org/onlinedocs/libstdc++/17_intro/license.html[/url]

Boost is actually a collection of libraries, with a few different licenses, but all boost library licenses meet the following license requirements describes in [url]http://www.boost.org/more/lib_guide.htm#License[/url]:
* Must be simple to read and understand.
* Must grant permission without fee to copy, use and modify the software for any use (commercial and non-commercial).
* Must require that the license appear on all copies of the software source code.
* Must not require that the license appear with executables or other binary uses of the library.
* Must not require that the source code be available for execution or other binary uses of the library.
* May restrict the use of the name and description of the library to the standard version found on the Boost web site.

This means that Boost is safe too.

Conclusion: Of gcc, glibc, libstdc++, and boost, none of these place any restrictions whatsoever on programs that you write, so each of them is completely safe to use.

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