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Forestknight25

is Code::Blocks an acceptable C compiler for professional games?

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Just curious if it is or not, because it's freeware. I know my programming teacher recommends it over Visual Studio, but I can't help but be skeptical. Would something free really be capable of that much, or should I go out and buy the overpriced Visual C++ instead? Just curious.

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Visual Studio Express Edition is free as well. It's a slightly cut-down version of the professional versions, but most of the missing features are ones you probably wouldn't use anyway.

I'd recommend Visual Studio over Code::Blocks, it's simply the best IDE out there for Windows, bar none.

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Visual Studio is pretty much industry standard from my understanding. So knowing how to get around it would be a plus since you'll probably encounter it.

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AFAIK GCC has a more complete implementation of C99, so that makes it a better C compiler in my book. If what you're after is a C++ compiler though, I'd say they're both more or less on equal grounds.

I've never used Code::Blocks, and I don't care for Visual Studio (I work mostly on GNU/Linux), so I can't recommend one over the other. They're both free (one as in free speech, both as in free beer), so try them both and see what you like better.

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Quote:
Original post by Forestknight25
or should I go out and buy the overpriced Visual C++ instead? Just curious.
Or you could download the free Visual Studio 2008 Express Edition. It or Code::Blocks would be acceptable for you to learn with, there's absolutely no reason you need to pay for a compiler and IDE while you're still learning.

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I use both Visual Studio 2005 (commercial version) and Code::Blocks. While I prefer VS, I must say that Code::Blocks is an excellent IDE - definitely a strong contender. It fills most needs a professional or hobby programmer needs.

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End users don't care what compiler you used, so used whichever one will help you out the most.

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Isn't Code::Blocks just an IDE? If you use Code::Blocks or something else, the generated code is going to be the same with the same compiler. That said, Code::Blocks works very well in combination with the GCC compiler and it's a great way to compile on multiple platforms as well. You can work in Code::Blocks on Mac, Linux, or Windows and setup cross-compilers so you won't even have to boot into the other operating systems to generate the appropriate code. I've used Code::Blocks for a couple of years now for both small-scale application development and more ambitious game projects and I'm very satisfied with it. My advise would be to check it out and see if you like it. But remember, with Visual Studio you're mostly tied to the Windows environment.

Jeroen

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Quote:
Original post by godmodder
Isn't Code::Blocks just an IDE?


Yes, Code::Blocks is "just" an IDE (not just another IDE like DevCpp - IMHO, CB is a great IDE), and I am quit amazed by that fact that none has mentioned it before your post :)
Code::Blocks works well with both GCC, MSVC and various other compilers.

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