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Endar

... it's just ... so big!

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Yesterday, I happened upon the admin staff at work unpacking our very first PS3 dev kit. Saying that I was surprised at it's size would be an understatement. So, here's the question: why are dev kits sooo much bigger than their retail counterparts? I mean, I'm currently working on the wii dev kit, and that must be 3-4 times the size of the retail. The 360 is almost the same size although it has a larger hard drive connection with some more plugs. The PS2 is bigger as well. The DS and PSP dev kits have a cable connected to a sizeable box. The PS3 size is damn ridiculous. When I first saw it I half expected it to be a new sever. I understand that generally dev kits give you more memory for debugging, but why are they so much bigger?

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Guest Deventer
I think they need to be so big to compliment their high cost. =)

By the way, the XBox 360 Development Kits don't give you more memory for debugging IIRC.

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:D

I also like (read: hate) the fact that paying the massive, massive, massive cost doesn't actually buy any hardware. It's just an indefinite license and when you stop using it you have to give the dev kit back.

Although I would expect that would be for all consoles, not only PS3.

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Guest Deventer
Pretty much. And then the software licensing was paid for separately. Though I think that might be changing now.

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You might also consider that they are a combination of the actual game hardware plus a separate PC that controls it.

I imagine that they just keep the same form factor as the shippable hardware (or even prototype hardware) and stick it next to a regular PC. And it isn't just that particular box, look through history and you'll see that devkits are almost always substantially larger than the retail counterparts.

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We've just got a PS3 devkit at work, we can't get it to work though :S. Its not as big as the early ones I saw pics of but is still quite large. Then, if you see a PS2 devkit that's pretty big too especially when you compare it to the slimline PS2's you can get.

I don't mind the Wii devkit, its just the software for developing that that I don't like. The NDS kit looks a bit too industrial for my liking, the PSP's is quite nice.

I haven't had access to a 360 devkit yet so I can't speak on that but the original Xbox devkit was huge, it was the same size as a retail Xbox. ;)

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Quote:
Original post by Naku
I haven't had access to a 360 devkit yet so I can't speak on that but the original Xbox devkit was huge, it was the same size as a retail Xbox. ;)

Well, we just got a 360 dev it (and test deck). That brick on the top really doesn't help its aesthetics.

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Quote:
Original post by Endar
I also like (read: hate) the fact that paying the massive, massive, massive cost doesn't actually buy any hardware. It's just an indefinite license and when you stop using it you have to give the dev kit back.
I hear that when DC Studios went under, they put most of their devkits into storage. Which then went suspiciously "missing" after one of the directors paid a visit.

You ocassionally see devkits and testkits on eBay, but they're usually taken down pretty quick.

We've got DS, Wii and PS2 devkits at work, the PS2 ones are the biggest, Wii isn't too bad, and the DS is relatively tiny considering what it does.

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