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mgph

what book should I get ?

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Hello....I'm currently studying in 1st year(1st semester) Bachelor of IT and I'm gonna take my exam of first programming subject about C (not yet C++ but in next term) tomorrow. So during my holidays, I want to learn some game programming books as I'm quite interested in games programming (that's one reason I chose the IT path and other is developing website) and I believe it'll also help me a lot for my C++ subject in next semester. The book the school recommended and I've studied so far is "Introduction to Programming with C++ fourth edition" and so, what book should I get and can study myself to get started in game programming ? appreciate for any suggestion and thanks in advance...

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The book your school has recommended is a poor choice. Stick with Accelerated C++ and C++ Primer. The former is more of a tutorial book to teach you C++ idioms, while the latter is more of a reference book. If you go through both, you'll most likely be better informed than quite a number of other beginner C++ programmers.

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I've read C++ Primer and Accelerated C++ and dont rate them very highly. Admittedly they're a bit basic for me, but from a purely objective point of view they just didn't teach me anything I wanted to know in a way that I could digest it very easily. I like my books to go down smooth ;-) I've also read a *lot* of C/C++ books (probably about 30+ books and counting), and I'm quite picky about what I learn from because I know that if I get the right book then I can learn a lot very quickly. It's all about personal taste, so be sure to read a few chapters of your book list before committing to your purchase(s).

If you want my advice then Thinking in C++ by Bruce Eckel is a very good book. Best of all, it's completely free and available in multiple formats from his website:
http://www.bruceeckel.com/

Also, the definitive tome is The C++ Language by Bjarne Stroustrup but you'll be paying for that one, plus it's not an easy read. It can be a bit heavy going down but when you need the definitive reference there is only one.

Bjarne Stroustrup also wrote a nice little book I used to keep with me which is C/C++ Pocket Reference. It was really pocket sized and a handy reference book to keep by your side when you dont want to have to dig out something bigger just to look something up. This book doesn't teach you anything, but it's very small and once you've digested the brunt of C/C++ you'll probably find something like this useful until you've committed it all to memory.

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Wow....thanks for your great recommendations...and fortunately, the books you mention are available at my library so I can try after my exam...

thanks so much for your help

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Quote:
Original post by TheGilb
I've read C++ Primer and Accelerated C++ and dont rate them very highly. Admittedly they're a bit basic for me, but from a purely objective point of view they just didn't teach me anything I wanted to know in a way that I could digest it very easily. I like my books to go down smooth ;-) I've also read a *lot* of C/C++ books (probably about 30+ books and counting), and I'm quite picky about what I learn from because I know that if I get the right book then I can learn a lot very quickly. It's all about personal taste, so be sure to read a few chapters of your book list before committing to your purchase(s).

If you want my advice then Thinking in C++ by Bruce Eckel is a very good book. Best of all, it's completely free and available in multiple formats from his website:
http://www.bruceeckel.com/

Also, the definitive tome is The C++ Language by Bjarne Stroustrup but you'll be paying for that one, plus it's not an easy read. It can be a bit heavy going down but when you need the definitive reference there is only one.

Bjarne Stroustrup also wrote a nice little book I used to keep with me which is C/C++ Pocket Reference. It was really pocket sized and a handy reference book to keep by your side when you dont want to have to dig out something bigger just to look something up. This book doesn't teach you anything, but it's very small and once you've digested the brunt of C/C++ you'll probably find something like this useful until you've committed it all to memory.





excellent exclusive

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Quote:
Original post by mgph
Wow....thanks for your great recommendations...and fortunately, the books you mention are available at my library so I can try after my exam...

thanks so much for your help


oh...I forgot to tell you that the book the school will use as a reference in next term is "Big C++"...Is that book good ? As far as I know about programming is that if I have a book that can be used either as a reference or to learn myself, I (probably) no need to look others until I reach to the certain level as this is not arts (no need to discuss/compare and the rules are the only ones).

So, can you comment me once more about Big C++ ?

thanks in advance !

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