Sign in to follow this  

engine - make it or use it?

This topic is 3594 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

If you intended to correct an error in the post then please contact us.

Recommended Posts

Hello, i'm a new registered user here and quite new to a real game programming. I made some small mods for existing games with their modding tools, and I think I should start trying to learn how to make games.. I have a question as a start, about game engine. In game programming, what should a game programmer do in the real world? I mean, if you work as game programmer, what do you do? Should you or your programming team make a game engine from start? Or maybe using existing game engine, which in my newbie opinnion, is much more easier than creating your own game engine... thanks before. regards, beantony.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by ChJees
Use a existing to get started directly at making games.
Make one to learn how a Game engine is structured.

All i have to say.


thanks for the reply. Anyway, I know that already.. what about the game programmer job? what are they do? using the engine or making it? or maybe both?
thanks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I think you've got to make games using other peoples engines before you can even think about writing your own.

You can't just start writing an engine to learn how one is structured - you have to look at existing ones to learn how one is structured.

[EDIT]
Most "game programmers" will be programming games. If you're programming an engine you'll probably be called an "engine programmer" and will work in a different team to the "game programmers".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by Hodgman
I think you've got to make games using other peoples engines before you can even think about writing your own.

You can't just start writing an engine to learn how one is structured - you have to look at existing ones to learn how one is structured.

[EDIT]
Most "game programmers" will be programming games. If you're programming an engine you'll probably be called an "engine programmer" and will work in a different team to the "game programmers".


that's fast. Thanks.

So, if i want to be a game programmer, I should leave the engine programming alone and start learning how to program or use the engine?

From what I heard before, most of them program the games using C++, is that statement true? When it comes to programming using game engine, should we master C++?

Which free game engine from do you think is easier to learn?
i got some links from http://www.gamedev.net/community/forums/topic.asp?topic_id=465629#FAQ-tutorials

and this is the list:
www.darkbasic.com
www.blitzbasic.com
http://crystal.sourceforge.net/tikiwiki/tiki-view_articles.php
www.neoengine.org/
www.ogre3d.org/
http://fly3d.com.br/
www.panardvision.com/v3/

well, my bad.. sorry for so many questions I asked. But thanks before for the answer.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
So, if i want to be a game programmer, I should leave the engine programming alone and start learning how to program or use the engine?
If you can't program games or use existing engines, you definitely won't be making one yourself. An engine is not a game. It's a generic system that can be used in multiple games. That tests your programming skills heavily. And making a generic engine vs. a game takes a lot more expert man hours.

You want to be a game programmer? Learn how to program independently of a mod tool. Learn non-game, generic programming from the ground up. Then when you have a good foundation, try to make games of increasing complexity.

Quote:
From what I heard before, most of them program the games using C++, is that statement true?
Yes, but don't translate this fact into "C++ is the best language". If you look at posts in the beginner forum, going back for, oh, even just two days, you'll find a bazillion warning signs from us saying, don't start with C++ as a first language.

Quote:
When it comes to programming using game engine, should we master C++?
You may eventually have to learn it. Or maybe not. With C#/XNA and what not, and a move towards higher level expressive languages, this may not be true.

Don't have delusions of your programming level though. You're not a master programmer working on his next Quake or Half-life quality project. You're working your way up from the bottom.

Quote:
Which free game engine from do you think is easier to learn?
No response. You're just going to start a useless "I like X better" list. You don't even program. Focus on learning a programming language like Python or C# first. No game programming in the beginning. Just learn a language properly.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by beantonythanks for the reply. Anyway, I know that already.. what about the game programmer job? what are they do? using the engine or making it? or maybe both?
thanks.


Engines are either made in-house or licensed. It all depends on the project, the company, and the game.

You're asking vague questions where there is no single answer.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
To get answer for this question, you should have a future plan of what you and your team decide for. This scope is on the game. If you have 5 people on your team and need really wanna make game, try game engine. no problem with that, if you have big budget, buy a great game engine with world editor. that spent lot of time making with fun and ease.

If you and your team have a lot of time and very-very good knowledge about programming, making a game engine is a good choice, but believe me you don't have anytime to do anything else...

for now, if your team is an independent game development, try using game engine.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
thanks.

btw, oler1s, i know what engine is... it's not a game, i wouldn't mention engine if i didn't know about it. I did few java based application programming, so i have some kind a foundation, even I don't know if it's enough to do game programming, though.

and yes, ofcourse i know, there is no best language. I've used few language and find out that c++ is quite hard. But if what you said is true, then I have to give c++ a try...

well, anyway, i'm new here and new to game programming, so i post in beginner section. But that doesn't mean I don't know any programming language. And so, I asked the question.

I still want to know, which one is better as starter?

but thanks anyway, oler1s, and also to gekko.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hay Beantony, are you from jakarta? so you can speak indonesian yes..??

Kalo lo bisa bahasa Indonesia, berarti kita deket bung, wakakakaka... lo lagi nyari game engine? sama, gw dan tim gw juga lagi ngincer Torque game engine. tapi untuk sementara gw belajar XNA dulu. sms gw dong di 085692791242 dengan indra

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by beantony
Quote:
Original post by ChJees
Use a existing to get started directly at making games.
Make one to learn how a Game engine is structured.

All i have to say.


thanks for the reply. Anyway, I know that already.. what about the game programmer job? what are they do? using the engine or making it? or maybe both?
thanks.


You have to choose what you want to do. Either you want to make a game or you want to make an engine.

If you're confused and can't choose either, start by making a game. Then, when you finished the game and is getting started on a second game, you might want to reuse components from the first game to save time. These shared components will then form your own engine.

If you're afraid of using an existing engine because of the uncertain future of the engine, a good tactic is to design your game so that it's not *totally* stuck together with a specific engine. Usually engines provide common services like: read/write textures, read/write model formats, etc, that are more or less exchangable between engines. Worst case scenario is that you'll have to rewrite parts yourself which would cost some time, but I wouldn't worry too much about that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Games don't need engines. They need certain functionality: checking user input, displaying graphics, playing sounds, and so on.

Because many games need the same, or similar, functionality, people decided to build reusable systems that provide such functionality. These are often called engines or frameworks. So don't let the term 'engine' mislead you: a game isn't a car, it's a vehicle. Manpower, horsepower, engine, whatever, it simply needs to move. Which propulsion system to use depends on the vehicle.


I'd say, start building a few small, simple games. After each game, try to reuse some code from the last one. Eventually, you'll start to see some recurring patterns - and likely room for improvement as well. After some time, you can rework this reusable code into a more formal framework, improving it with each game you work on. This is what I'm currently doing and it's working pretty well.

So by all means, write or use code that makes development easier, but whether you call it an engine, a framework or something else doesn't matter. In the end, what matters is when the game gets done. Time is money. ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This topic is 3594 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

If you intended to correct an error in the post then please contact us.

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this