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A 2-player strategy game with direct internet connection?

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Hi we are making a 2-player turn based strategy game. Each turn could last about a minute and the game itself might last 1/2 hour. The amount of data transmitted is very minimal - maybe a 100 kilobytes per turn max. We are looking for examples of games that allow play over the internet that would fit in this category to analyze how their user interface and technology works. We are programming in C++. Does anyone have any good examples of shareware games of this kind that have this kind of net-based play?

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I'm working on the same type of game, have most of my networking code complete... look into MOO2 and MOO3... the final game of MOO3 sucked but the concept and ideas were great and highly anticipated, unfortunately it flopped on execution... I tried playing MOO3 a few times online but gave up in frustration...

Can't recall if they supported online or not but look into the Warlords series...

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100k means that after each turn, players will need to wait some 30 seconds for state synchronization (using common 3kb/sec assumption for internet connection).

Since you're not doing real-time, timing isn't really an issue, and that makes many things simpler.

Each player will have their game state. During each turn, players perform actions. When turn is complete, some logic runs that calculates the effects, and starts new turn.

One of easier, and quite reliable ways to do this is by sending player's input in real-time as it occurs. Each client then knows exactly what the other did in between, and can take that into account when turn is complete.

You can look into forum FAQ under RTS, even if you don't need real-time. The above approach also allows each client to check for valid state - both clients will run on exactly the same inputs, simulating exactly the same state (not real-time, so considerably easier). If any of the clients cheats, other will detect that when receiving the commands.

And, this approach would mean minimal traffic and minimal latency.

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This topic is 3586 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

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