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Version Control for personal projects on Vista

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Hi, I am looking for a simple and easy to setup version control system for my personal projects on Windows Vista. Since I only have one desktop at home, so no separate server machine. In addision it should also have good branching and merging supports, as I like experimenting different ideas. Many such systems I have found do not have very good support for Vista. I have a copy of Visual SourceSafe 2005, from what I heard it seems to support Vista, but I am quite hessitated to try it because of its bad reputation(Hmmm, It may be worth a try, VSS seems to work pretty well for small-size projects...). Any suggestion or direction will be appreciated. Thanks in advance!!

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Original post by Dave
I use this. There is a tool called RapidSVN which works nicely too. There is also Perforce which i love. However to use it for more than 5 clients and 2 users you need a licence.


Thanks for the quick reply.

Does SVN server support Vista Home Basic? Do I have to manually install Apache or svnserver?

The version control is used exclusively by me only, the Perforce's client limit has no problem to me, but it seems a bit clunky for one-man projects. Anyways I will try it, and see how it goes.

Thank you for the suggestions!

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Original post by Classless
Does SVN server support Vista Home Basic? Do I have to manually install Apache or svnserver?

IIRC a local svn repository doesn't require apache or svnserver. If you install TortoiseSVN theres a simple right click -> "create repository here" option.

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Original post by OrangyTang
Quote:
Original post by Classless
Does SVN server support Vista Home Basic? Do I have to manually install Apache or svnserver?

IIRC a local svn repository doesn't require apache or svnserver. If you install TortoiseSVN theres a simple right click -> "create repository here" option.


Awesome, thank you for the info. And I just found that using Google Code can also save me from installing the server. Can anyone comment on its speed?

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One more vote for subversion.

It's very widespread and you won't have to buy a license if you ever happen work on a project with more than 2 users. From my experience, it's incredibly fast, too. At work, we've got a 2 GB+ repository with 5000 revisions used by ~10 people and browsing, copying, committing is as fast as browsing folders or copying plain files in windows explorer.

-Markus-


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I use SVN at home, VSS2005 at work.

I've also used CVS and Rational Clearcase in other jobs.

I recommend SVN for you - Clearcase is very expensive and very complicated (but, IMO, very nice), CVS has essentially been obsoleted by SVN and VSS2005 is lacking in comparrison to the others.

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Another vote for Perforce. I just really like it. And last summer, I discovered that there's an API you can use to have your applications integrate with the version control, the same way Visual Studio does. Perhaps other version control systems do as well, but I'm personally in love with Perforce.

Then again, I've never had to pay for a license [wink] But for a single person working on hobby projects it's fantastic.

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I like Perforce the most so far, but if I had to support more than 2 users + 5 clients I'd have to choose one of the other free ones. I haven't had enough experience to pick from those though.

So, the deal with the users/clients separation in Perforce is so you can have one user access the source control depot from multiple computers. So if you wanted to work on a project both from work and at home, you might have two clients set up for that purpose.

Also, if you intend to access your home Perforce server via the internet, read up on the 'p4 protect' command. By default Perforce doesn't have passworded security enabled.

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Original post by Nypyren
I like Perforce the most so far, but if I had to support more than 2 users + 5 clients I'd have to choose one of the other free ones. I haven't had enough experience to pick from those though.

So, the deal with the users/clients separation in Perforce is so you can have one user access the source control depot from multiple computers. So if you wanted to work on a project both from work and at home, you might have two clients set up for that purpose.

Also, if you intend to access your home Perforce server via the internet, read up on the 'p4 protect' command. By default Perforce doesn't have passworded security enabled.

Yeah I've been using Perforce since it seems like everyone else including Microsoft is using it these days.
I just wish they didn't have like 10 different packages to install. Then again I guess that's what you get when you want a powerful source control solution.
It integrates nicely with Visual Studio once you get it all setup though!

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Original post by daviangel
Yeah I've been using Perforce since it seems like everyone else including Microsoft is using it these days.


Appeals to authority FTW!

Don't waste your time with running Perforce locally. Find a good free source control provider (Google Code is awesome, SourceForge works but is kinda awful, there are lots and lots of others) and find a source control client for whatever server they provide. Why? For a single person getting started with source control (i.e. with no prior preferences or requirements), the differences between each of the tools doesn't matter. What does matter is keeping your code safe. Hosting it at home won't give you this, and the free source control providers will. Use them!

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Original post by Cygon
One more vote for subversion.

It's very widespread and you won't have to buy a license if you ever happen work on a project with more than 2 users. From my experience, it's incredibly fast, too. At work, we've got a 2 GB+ repository with 5000 revisions used by ~10 people and browsing, copying, committing is as fast as browsing folders or copying plain files in windows explorer.

-Markus-


That's a pretty small setup, and completely the reverse of my experiences.
We have a 60GB+ repos with 60 users and ~50000 revisions at work and SVN is so slow it's virtually unusable. Even the client side stuff is cripplingly slow - partial updates take in excess of ten minutes, mostly due to client-side disk thrash, commits take several minutes to even work out which files have changed let alone actually doing the commit. A full checkout of the repos takes a few hours.

I'd really recommend anything over SVN if you can see the project growing at all.

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Original post by Jerax
Quote:
Original post by Cygon
One more vote for subversion.

It's very widespread and you won't have to buy a license if you ever happen work on a project with more than 2 users. From my experience, it's incredibly fast, too. At work, we've got a 2 GB+ repository with 5000 revisions used by ~10 people and browsing, copying, committing is as fast as browsing folders or copying plain files in windows explorer.

-Markus-


That's a pretty small setup, and completely the reverse of my experiences.
We have a 60GB+ repos with 60 users and ~50000 revisions at work and SVN is so slow it's virtually unusable. Even the client side stuff is cripplingly slow - partial updates take in excess of ten minutes, mostly due to client-side disk thrash, commits take several minutes to even work out which files have changed let alone actually doing the commit. A full checkout of the repos takes a few hours.

I'd really recommend anything over SVN if you can see the project growing at all.


Realistically, most of the client performance problem comes from Windows, not Subversion. Windows/NTFS is awful at dealing with many small files, unfortunately.

The server performance problems could be the same reason. I strongly suggest using Linux with the FSFS SVN backend and svnserve for best performance.

Newer versions of Subversion try to work around this deficiency in Windows by reworking the local working copy to use many less files, and I believe there is more work underway to use SQLite to store pristine local files copies rather than stashing them under a .svn directory.

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I vote against subversion.

I use it at work in a web environment. I really have nothing good to say about it. It's very brittle. Delete, relocate, or rename anything and welcome to Version Control Heck. It does branch and merge, but it has no native concept of branches. All it really does is copy files around and make you splice them back together in manual, very confusing, and highly error prone ways. All this AND it pollutes your file structure with those retched .svn directories.

Oh! But it's free!*

* I support open source in general, but strongly dislike Subversion.

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In particular I use the CollabNet Subversion Server in conjunction with TortoiseSVN. CollabNet's installer includes Apache bundled with the subversion client and server tools. The server portion is automatically installed as a service. I can't say if it works with Vista, though. I've only used it on XP.

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