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Python for Games - Anybody Been There Done That?

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What is the feasibility of using Python for game development? I don't know python, so i thought it might be interesting to learn with game dev in mind. I have a lot of experience with C++ for game dev and i work secularly in web technologies. I've used OpenGL and SDL and i know that python has bindings for a lot of graphics and sound libs. I also know it's roughly C++-like in it's general OOP nature. So would it be worth my time to learn or should i stick with what i've got? Can you point to any examples of non-trivial games made with python? (By trivial, i mean Tetris, Solitaire, etc.. much of what i've seen from PyGame seems to be in the trivial catagory) Thanks!

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I can't name any non trivial games written exclusively in Python. If you want non trivial games that used Python along with another language you can look at Freedom Force and the Third Reich and Civilization 4, both of which used Python for scripting.

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Quote:
Original post by SiCrane
I can't name any non trivial games written exclusively in Python.


*cough* EvE Online *cough*

That's exclusive enough to count for something in my book. It's only the largest MMO cluster.

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I think you are missing the entire point of using Python?
It lets you rapidly prototype your ideas that would take much more time using other languages.
Then again you won't see the Pythonic way until you start doing some Python coding of your own so it's never a waste of time to learn Python IMO.
Nontrivial games and Python

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As you probably know, all of the major programming languages are Turing-complete so anything done with one can be duplicated with another. And of course programming languages don't determine how good the art looks. So any great-looking game could theoretically be reproduced pixel-for-pixel, frame-for-frame in another language.

I believe what we're seeing is a "filtering" effect. C++ effectively weeds out most of the amateurs. Even a simple game requires a huge investment of deep study into the mystical vagaries of this language. Only the truly dedicated ones make it through to the finish. So it should come as no surprise that they produce a higher ratio of professional-looking results. Python, on the other hand, doesn't put up so much of a fight against the amateur's progress. More of the "lesser skilled" programmers are able to complete a game. All around you'll see a higher ratio of simple, unpolished, or even just plain ugly or crappy games.

That's my theory anyway.

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