• Announcements

    • khawk

      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
d000hg

Sword fighting in games?

22 posts in this topic

I've never seen a fast-paced action game where you fight using a sword. I know many RPGs have swords but are they ever more than "click to swing sword"? We have both fighting games and FPS type games but I've never seen one that used a sword in any non-trivial way, like Doom's chainsaw. Are there any games which use swords in some proper sword-fight, where you can parry and so on? Were there any which were good?
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Don't forget Jedi Academy!!! You could essentially direct where the strike or block was going to hit.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Die By The Sword almost proved that first person sword fighting with 'realistic' controls aren't fun ;¬) It certainly convinced me of it at the time.

Bushido Blade was a great game.

Oblivion's combat was quite fun and certainly more realtime than most RPGs.

What about the Soulblade / SoulCalibur series?
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I really liked fighting with a sword in Prince of Persia I & II, but I'm not sure it's what you want.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Morrowind and Oblivion are like that, but they still adhere to your character's stats.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by mrbastard
Die By The Sword almost proved that first person sword fighting with 'realistic' controls aren't fun ;¬) It certainly convinced me of it at the time.

It comes down to your own preference, I guess. I still have a copy of DBTS right here, and I remember loving it. A game that I think did it better, but wasnt totally mouse-based, was Severence(aka Blade of Darkness). Both those two cemented it for me, which is why I am designing in some minor twitch-based combat into my project.

With some tweaking, you can get Blade of Darkness to play on WinXP with a modern graphics card, you should check it out. In my opinion, it was highly underrated.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Are we talking 3rd/1st person? There are a huge amount of titles in which you can hack/slash/stab/block. Dime a dozen. Almost every game features a sword somewhere....

When it comes to realistic sword fight development, we should ask "what control system is most intuitive to be swinging the sword with?"

Die By The Sword had huge potential, with its VISM system, heavy use of physics, and inverse kinematics. However, the r.s.i. inflicting mouse/keyboard combo turned a lot of players off.

Consider the potential if this games controls were mapped to a Wiimote+Nunchuck!

We could potentially control our swords dynamically, in full 3D space. Cant wait to belt a baddie with the flat side of my sword to stun him, or twist the blade in thier gut for the finishing blow...

Control systems are what restrict us from feeling the immersion of potentially "dynamic" sword fights.

In other words - Bring on DBTS for Wii!
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by Jessebalsom
Die By The Sword had huge potential, with its VISM system, heavy use of physics, and inverse kinematics. However, the r.s.i. inflicting mouse/keyboard combo turned a lot of players off.

Consider the potential if this games controls were mapped to a Wiimote+Nunchuck!

We could potentially control our swords dynamically, in full 3D space. Cant wait to belt a baddie with the flat side of my sword to stun him, or twist the blade in thier gut for the finishing blow...

Control systems are what restrict us from feeling the immersion of potentially "dynamic" sword fights.

In other words - Bring on DBTS for Wii!


Too late:
Die by the Sword - Wiimote & Nunchuk

I've just reinstalled my copy of DBTS and then found that video. I just setup my wiimote, and will report back if it makes it any better.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Why in gods name hasn't Zelda come up yet?

All of the 3D zeldas had what I'd call perfect sword controls; that fine point between believable, responsive and fun.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Got my wiimote working with DBTS last night and it was pretty darn fun. I had totally forgotten that DBTS had an move editor, which is something I have been designing recently. It was good to see it in action to know what I can improve upon.

I do have to say, it is definitely a good idea to go back and play old games that have ideas you want to see in action, even if they are only slightly similar. These can help you refine your new idea in ways that you wouldn't have foreseen.

About the games not mentioned, I was going to edit my post and add Mount and Blade, but saw someone had already mentioned it. I can't believe we all forgot to mention Zelda though ;). That should be toward the top of the list for interactive combat.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The real question is how exactly you want to be "realistic" with your combat. With current technology there are concessions to be made.
You could, for example, use the forms of Tower Fechtbuch and give your self a historically accurate combat system, for a price. You would have to limit the controls to the forms, and because of the nature of the imputes systems of today, you would be pretty much limited to the strategic side of it.
It would be great for singular combat or player versus player. But it would lack, by necessity the elements that draw players to games such as Prince of Persia, or Oblivion.
Another point to be made is the fact that realistic is not always "fun" to the average player. For instance there is edge bashing, blade to blade full on collision, or static blocking. These things are common parts of the gaming experience, they are also dead wrong. But the issue rises in how to go around that factor whilst retaining real time play. The fact remains that it can be simply more entertaining to bend the rules a bit, and allow such matters, for the simple fact that the game play is fun.
Combine all that is stated above with one additional factor. Numbers. How many times have you played a game where your death toll tops three digits? Would the average gamer enjoy having to fight enemies one at a time? While I personally would enjoy that mechanic, it is not the one that a player would seek when buying a combat game.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
There's a whole class of games that focus on this: Japanese-style action games. The three examples most commonly cited are Devil May Cry, Ninja Gaiden, and God of War.

But sword fighting has actually been done rather a lot in action games, both Western and Eastern.

Doing it well, though, is another story. I've never been very fond of the models most games use to simulate sword fighting; Guns tend to be handled much more realistically. And yet, it's very difficult to realistically simulate sword fights with the controls we typically use for games.

The Wii could do it though.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Jedi Outcast had good lightsaber action.
Jedi Academy was more hack and slash with all the various styles and sabers.
This discussion came up in my Jedi Outcast clan though. A game with swordplay that is realistic and responsive instead of the usual hack and slash or preset combos.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0