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xssvgamer

Some guidance

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Hey, I'm xssvgamer... Im new to gamedev.net and im hoping to learn alot about game programming, so far i only know web languages with minimal c++ knowledge. So far i know HTML, PHP, CSS, MySQL and javascript. In c++ i can code a basic login script and i made a small text based RPG about 2 months ago. Right now im just seeking some guidance on how and where to start with c++, i want to eventually start making 2d games and then onto 3d games but i dont know whether to start using visual c++ or just normal c++. I dont know why but i sort of see visual c++ as cheating or not really programming because im assuming its liek visual basic. As we speek im just starting to create a new text based RPG, anyway thats me and i hope someone can get back to me with a nice tutorial site on openGL or something. Thanks in advanced.

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Hi there. I'm not really sure what to tell you at the moment, but perhaps you'd like to profile what programming concepts you're already familiar with so that people aren't suggesting things you already know. I'm pretty sure you know all about loops, functions and what have you, but what about classes, templates, and data structures?

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im familiar with arrays, functions, loops, whiles, classes and if's from php. Im not sure about pointers i cant understand it, i have a learn c++ book but its hard to understand whilst reading, for me. Templates im not sure about along side data structures.

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Original post by xssvgamer
Right now im just seeking some guidance on how and where to start with c++, i want to eventually start making 2d games and then onto 3d games but i dont know whether to start using visual c++ or just normal c++. I dont know why but i sort of see visual c++ as cheating or not really programming because im assuming its liek visual basic.

Visual C++, or Microsoft Visual C++, is an IDE, just like Code::Blocks and the outdated Dev-C++. C++ is the language. Even so, using proper tools or rapid development languages isn't 'cheating'. If Visual Basic gets the job done, then by all means just use it. Programming isn't about using a 'real' or 'hard' language. C++ is a popular language, but certainly not the best for all purposes.

If you want to start building games sooner rather than later, then using Python and PyGame might be a far better choice for now. It's a relatively easy-to-learn language, has far less pitfalls than C++ and it's a lot faster to work with. Granted, this often comes at a price: lower performance and/or higher memory usage, but for smaller games, that shouldn't be much of a problem, as you'll hardly notice a difference, if any difference at all. It's a great tool for rapid prototyping and you'll learn the basics of game development with it just as well. Perhaps even better because there's less low-level technical details you have to worry about.


And that comes from the mouth of someone who saw C++ as the only real language, and Python as a kiddies scripting language, some years ago... ;)

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quanta, it is lol. and ok il try python out, but refering to your point earlier about programming isnt about using hard languages... in my opinion whilst im leanring i might aswell go for the harder route and learn more if you see where im coming from, but thanks again.

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in my opinion whilst im leanring i might aswell go for the harder route and learn more if you see where im coming from, but thanks again.
I see precisely what you're saying, and it's wrong. Harder is not better, and it does not mean you learn more. I could travel to England by boat instead of plane, a much harder choice for me. It's definitely not better though. The same simplistic equivalence of "harder = better" does not translate to the programming world either.

If you are already using C++, and are starting to make games with it, you might not want to switch just yet. Then again, it doesn't hurt to experiment with Python, as you can always return to C++.

For now, if you intend to stay with C++, focus on text games only. You need to build your C++ language foundation. You also need to program your generic skills as a programmer. Increasingly complex text games will challenge your data structures and algorithms knowledge. They'll also force you to tackle bigger design issues.

As far as I can tell, you only had one question in your original post. And that is, "get back to me with an OpenGL tutorial". No can do. You can Google this or find it yourself. You should be scouring this forum for old posts with useful knowledge anyway.

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Original post by oler1s
Quote:
in my opinion whilst im leanring i might aswell go for the harder route and learn more if you see where im coming from, but thanks again.
I see precisely what you're saying, and it's wrong. Harder is not better, and it does not mean you learn more.


QFE.

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Thanks for the replys by the way..

[quote]Original post by oler1s
Quote:

As far as I can tell, you only had one question in your original post. And that is, "get back to me with an OpenGL tutorial". No can do. You can Google this or find it yourself. You should be scouring this forum for old posts with useful knowledge anyway.


My acctual question was whether or not to use visual c++ and i was trying to get an opinion on it, sorry if i didnt get to the point. at the end looking for openGL tutorials was just a side question if anyone from the forums had any quick links.


Quote:

i dont know whether to start using visual c++ or just normal c++. I dont know why but i sort of see visual c++ as cheating or not really programming because im assuming its liek visual basic.


Quote:
I see precisely what you're saying, and it's wrong. Harder is not better


i know i shouldnt have but i assumed that visual basic was the same as visual c++, e.g. dragging things from a toolbar or clicking in the box to write text.

Thats why i said it would be better to go the harder way pointing at captain P's earlier post
Quote:

If Visual Basic gets the job done, then by all means just use it. Programming isn't about using a 'real' or 'hard' language.


i was just saying since i learning, going for the one that just gets the job done rather than learning more in the process of it would be better.

I've searched through google alot before hand, iv'e found tutorials but on most of the ones i see theyre outdated so i cant contact the owner if there is an error etc.

But im going to carry on in c++ text based games for now i think and look up python another time maybe, iv'e downloaded and installed it anyway so if i ever feel like it i can have a go with it. The only thing that bugs me is i feel like im going nowhere when making text based games, so i just thought id try and get a better at things.

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Ok you want to know where and how to start with C++? You will need Visual C++ 2008 express from Microsoft, and may I suggest the excellent and free book Thinking In C++ by Bruce Eckel, it really is superb and as an existing programmer you should digest what's in there relatively easily.

Once you know C++ quite well you'll be itching to jump into something with 'a bit of meat'. There are many tutorial on dx and ogl online, but you may find buying a good book works better for you because it will have all the knowledge you need within its pages (no searching) and current gen books tend to help steer you towards writing your own libraries / etc. It's all good advice.

If you want to get to grips with ogl (and I thoroughly recommend it) then you'll want to learn probably from nehe.gamedev.net. I warn you, the tutorials aren't amazing but there's quite a few of them and well I started there so it cant be that bad :-)

Good luck! It's never easy, but it's always fun taking part!!

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I'm actually going to say that harder sometimes is better. But that's just me and i usually do things the hard way just to have done it. I think learning C++ taught me a lot about programming (both good and bad) and helped me unlearn some bad habits i picked up from Perl and PHP.

Anyway, MSVC 2008 express or Code::Blocks would be an easy way to get started on windows. I would also suggest learning SDL before learning OpenGL. OGL is a little bit harder to grock. SDL is a simpler 2D graphics lib with an easy to understand API. You can get something up and running in a few hours with no previous graphics experience whatsoever. Once you understand how to set it up, OpenGL actually piggybacks onto SDL. At that point, i would also recommend the NeHe tutorials. There is a good set of SDL tutorials floating around, but i haven't the link at the moment. sorry!

I second the Thinking In C++ books. I've read many C++ books and it is definitely one of the better ones.

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