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Or maybe it's original. I'm a new programmer, except for some web development, and I have done a lot of research towards what programming language I want to use. I have chosen C++. I don't know if I will stay with this choice though so I don't want to pay for a book yet. I've seen both C++ A Dialog and the Thinking In C++ series online. Which one of these is best towards learning how to program? Which one will be best for a long-off goal of creating games? Once again, I'm sorry if this has been asked before. Thanks in advance!

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Python if you just want to actually make a game :P.
C++ if you want more power but more complexity.

Use Python if you do not want to spend 1-3 years learning C++ from scratch to just make a game :P.

But go ahead with C++, it is worth it in the end.

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Deitel and Deitel, How to Program

It's very meaty and at this point don't even think about game development [wink]

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You would be far better choosing a more expressive language like Python.

Quote:
Original post by ChJees
C++ if you want more power but more complexity.


Explain.

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If you eventually want to find a job in the game industry then I'd go with C++.

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My question was not about the language.
I already know I'm going to use C++.
My question was which of those two books is better.

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"Better" is subjective. I have lots of programming books, and I rarely use them, instead favouring web searches. I occasionally use the "OpenGL Red Book" as a reference, but thats it.

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Quote:
Original post by rip-off
You would be far better choosing a more expressive language like Python.

Quote:
Original post by ChJees
C++ if you want more power but more complexity.


Explain.

More low level stuff.

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Both of those books are decent, why don't you read the first few chapters of both and choose the one you seem to work with best?

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Quote:
Original post by ChJees
More low level stuff.

Low level != power. I can program with a hex editor. That's not power. It's annoyance.

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Quote:
Original post by fanninator
My question was which of those two books is better.

My recommendation is that you go to the bookstore and look at the two books. Figure out for yourself which one walks you through the material in a way that's clearer for you.

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Quote:
Original post by speciesUnknown
"Better" is subjective. I have lots of programming books, and I rarely use them, instead favouring web searches. I occasionally use the "OpenGL Red Book" as a reference, but thats it.


I have to agree with this. I have quite a few books (over $500 worth) on game development and programming (mostly C++, DirectX, and Graphics theory books) and I wouldn't really recommend buying any of them. I've learned everything from online resources and trial and error.

The only other advice I can offer is: before you start posting for more help, work on your post titles. It'll draw in the people that know how to fix it, but won't be able to tell what you're looking for.

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I don't know much about those books, but if they're free online (and this is your only reason for using them), why not use both? Then you can pick the one you feel is more to your liking (or stick with both for two different perspectives).

If you're willing to drop some money for a book,
Deitel and Deitel, "C++ How to Program" as Boder suggested is a pretty good book.

It's a bit dry, but it covers everything a beginner would need, and is a great jumping off point if you wanted to get into games.

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C++ A Dialog might be more suited for you as Thinking in C++ assumes you know some C as it doesn't teach the basic material such as loops, conditionals, variables etc.

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Quote:
Original post by ChJees
But go ahead with C++, it is worth it in the end.


Explain, please!

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Python and Pygame, use the book "Game Programming The L Line, The Express Line to Learning" by Andy Harris and you'll be writing games in a month. The more games you write the more game programming concepts you will learn. That is the key. Languages you can learn throughout your career but a good solid set of game programming fundamentals is what you need at your core. And what better way than not to slog through years of learning C++ but actually put out decent games with that book, python and pygame in a month before you lose interest because you are bogged down in a particular language. Make programming fun again! If its not fun you'll give up more quickly.

Cheers,
Jan

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Quote:
Original post by Jan Johannsen
Python and Pygame, use the book "Game Programming The L Line, The Express Line to Learning" by Andy Harris and you'll be writing games in a month. The more games you write the more game programming concepts you will learn. That is the key. Languages you can learn throughout your career but a good solid set of game programming fundamentals is what you need at your core. And what better way than not to slog through years of learning C++ but actually put out decent games with that book, python and pygame in a month before you lose interest because you are bogged down in a particular language. Make programming fun again! If its not fun you'll give up more quickly.

Cheers,
Jan

Yup I totally agree but since that's not what the OP wants to hear my suggestion is:
Take laptop to borders if you don't have money and sit there reading all day ,like I've seen people do before , and decide for yourself since you'll have to get used to making lots of decisions choosing C++. Like what compiler to use?
What API to use?
Allegro?
SDL?
etc...

p.s. What out for the Deitel book "dry" is an understatement and you'll probably fall asleep before you get your first program written!
Oh and if I sound a bit curt it's because Yeah this question has been asked before a million times before. At least once a week I imagine...

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