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Rydinare

Visual Studio 2005 on Vista

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Rydinare    487
Anyone else using Visual Studio on Vista? The big annoyance I have is that periodically when creating new files or folders programmatically or through external programs called by VS, they are created with no permissions and I have to manually fix the permissions. This seems ridiculous. How can a security model prevent me from accessing the files I just created? That makes no sense, so maybe I'm missing something? One suggested option was disabling UAC, but I had complications when trying that option.

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Rydinare    487
Quote:
Original post by agm_ultimatex
My buddy in school had various compile errors running 2005. Download 2008 express, and it should work fine for ya. He did not have any problems after that.


We have Visual Studio 2008, but have not made the migration yet. The main annoyances would be having to rebuild Boost and Qt for VS2008. I'm not sure the tech lead would want any time spent on that, but I guess I could see if it's a possibility.

Your friend's experience is that VS2008 fixed many of the Vista annoyances w/ VS?

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daviangel    604
Quote:
Original post by Vampyre_Dark
Wasn't there a VISTA patch for VS2005?

Yes but it still ask you to run as administrator everytime unlike VS 2008 since it wasn't written with Vista security in mind.
I'd just use VS2008 if you can.

p.s. And yeah you'll get all kinds of weird file permission errors under Vista espcially when running under a standard account. I've also seen programs create directories and files that later cannot be accessed even with UAC prompt!

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Rydinare    487
Quote:
Original post by ViperG
You need the service pack and hot fix's:

VS80sp1-KB926601-X86-ENU
VS80sp1-KB932232-X86-ENU


I believe that's what I have installed on my work system, as they make VS2005 usable on Vista. However, they're not seeming to fix the issues with VS not appropriately launching other processes with the appropriate permissions.

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mutex    1111
Quote:
Original post by Rydinare
Anyone else using Visual Studio on Vista? The big annoyance I have is that periodically when creating new files or folders programmatically or through external programs called by VS, they are created with no permissions and I have to manually fix the permissions. This seems ridiculous. How can a security model prevent me from accessing the files I just created? That makes no sense, so maybe I'm missing something?

One suggested option was disabling UAC, but I had complications when trying that option.
In what directory are you creating these files? It almost sounds like they're not inheriting permissions correctly from the parent directory.

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Rydinare    487
Quote:
Original post by mutex
Quote:
Original post by Rydinare
Anyone else using Visual Studio on Vista? The big annoyance I have is that periodically when creating new files or folders programmatically or through external programs called by VS, they are created with no permissions and I have to manually fix the permissions. This seems ridiculous. How can a security model prevent me from accessing the files I just created? That makes no sense, so maybe I'm missing something?

One suggested option was disabling UAC, but I had complications when trying that option.
In what directory are you creating these files? It almost sounds like they're not inheriting permissions correctly from the parent directory.


In many of the cases, it was simply creating temporary files below the folder that my project was in. The folder had permissions but the lower level folders were granted with no permissions and the local user as owner instead of the domain user. Very strange, right?

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Shiny    456
It's a no brainer, but can make things go boom; if not checked already -- ensure VS is always running as Admin -- and that anything it invokes is too. Otherwise ownership issues will keep spawning :(

If this doesn't help...hm, I use TweakVI to turn off all scary Vista UAC stuff -- maybe you can avoid the problems this way. Obviously this won't help for testing (everyone at home will likely have it turned ON), but for dev it might :)

~Shiny

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mutex    1111
Quote:
Original post by Rydinare
Quote:
Original post by mutex
Quote:
Original post by Rydinare
Anyone else using Visual Studio on Vista? The big annoyance I have is that periodically when creating new files or folders programmatically or through external programs called by VS, they are created with no permissions and I have to manually fix the permissions. This seems ridiculous. How can a security model prevent me from accessing the files I just created? That makes no sense, so maybe I'm missing something?

One suggested option was disabling UAC, but I had complications when trying that option.
In what directory are you creating these files? It almost sounds like they're not inheriting permissions correctly from the parent directory.


In many of the cases, it was simply creating temporary files below the folder that my project was in. The folder had permissions but the lower level folders were granted with no permissions and the local user as owner instead of the domain user. Very strange, right?
And what folder do you store your projects in, and what are the permissions on that folder?

It sounds bizarre to me because I've never had problems like this, and I run both VS 2005 and 2008 unelevated with UAC turned on.

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daviangel    604
Quote:
Original post by mutex
Quote:
Original post by Rydinare
Quote:
Original post by mutex
Quote:
Original post by Rydinare
Anyone else using Visual Studio on Vista? The big annoyance I have is that periodically when creating new files or folders programmatically or through external programs called by VS, they are created with no permissions and I have to manually fix the permissions. This seems ridiculous. How can a security model prevent me from accessing the files I just created? That makes no sense, so maybe I'm missing something?

One suggested option was disabling UAC, but I had complications when trying that option.
In what directory are you creating these files? It almost sounds like they're not inheriting permissions correctly from the parent directory.


In many of the cases, it was simply creating temporary files below the folder that my project was in. The folder had permissions but the lower level folders were granted with no permissions and the local user as owner instead of the domain user. Very strange, right?
And what folder do you store your projects in, and what are the permissions on that folder?

It sounds bizarre to me because I've never had problems like this, and I run both VS 2005 and 2008 unelevated with UAC turned on.

There is quite a list of issues actually with VS2005 and Vista which you can see here. That's probably why they advise to run with admin permission since it doesn't look like they will be releasing another service pack for VS2005 anytime soon now that VS 2008 is out.
Same thing goes for SQL Server 2005. Actually, same problems will most likely occur for any app that wasn't designed with Vista's elevated security precautions in mind hence the aggravation and refusal of some individuals to upgrade!

Visual Studio 2005 on Windows Vista Issue List
The information below identifies the known issues you will face when using Visual Studio 2005 on Windows Vista. When using Visual Studio 2005, we advise you to do the following:

* Run Visual Studio with elevated administrator permissions
* Be a member of the "Administrators" group on the local machine
* Right-click the Visual Studio icon and select the "Run as administrator" option from the context menu

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