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Good AI Theory Books

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I am looking for a book that is more in the theory of AI and the understanding then the underlying programming of it. Since my programming skills are still minimal at best and basic games are the best I can program. However I would like to major in AI and want a head start. So any good books or authors you can recommend would be great. Thank you

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"Artificial Intelligence: A Modern Approach" is the most common college textbook on the theory. There is another I like that is simply called "Artificial Intelligence", but it is at work so I can't give you the correct authors right now...

These books will assume that you are already familiar with basic algorithmics, data structures, search algorithms, graph theory and the like, and that you have college-level math skills.

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I was going to recommend "Artificial Intelligence: A Modern Approach" as well. That's the textbook we used when I tutored the subject, and it's a good book. However as Steadtler wrote it might assume you know the basics of algorithms and data structures.

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I have a copy of "Introduction to Artificial Intelligence" by Philip Jackson sitting on my TV. I'm not sure how much programming theory it has, but there is definitely theory, even most of a chapter devoted to axons and neurons and the like. Haven't had time to read it all since it's kinda boring to be honest.
Not a bad read for only about $20 at B&N.

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Russel & Norvig, "AI - A Modern Approach" is the de facto standard. Before I got "officially" tutored using this book, I was teaching myself with George Luger's book on AI, which I liked as well. R&N was deeper on theory but - for my perception - occasionally does a bad job at explaining certain things. So I noticed that without my memories of Luger's slightly more comprehensive explanations, I would have had a more difficult time.

I'd still go with R&N.

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Given the parameters you mentioned (i.e. theory with little or no code) then R&N it is. BTW, it's not small. Put a chiropractor on retainer.

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Quote:
Original post by Sleep
Russel & Norvig, "AI - A Modern Approach" is the de facto standard.


I have heard that, despite the name, this book is now a little dated. Can anybody comment on this claim?

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Quote:
Original post by Kylotan
Quote:
Original post by Sleep
Russel & Norvig, "AI - A Modern Approach" is the de facto standard.


I have heard that, despite the name, this book is now a little dated. Can anybody comment on this claim?


True, it's been 6 years since the 2nd edition. I am not expert enough as that I could recommend something else, though. In terms of theory, though, not too much should have changed. Search still works the same way, knowledge representation still works on FOL, bayesian networks are still widely used, etc...

Of course, Machine learning and NLP of course are fields on their own and make fast-paced progress. If somebody would search up-to-date information on this, I would not recommend a general AI book anyway.

Actually, if someone has a state-of-the-art book at hand, I would want to know about it, too.

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Quote:
Original post by Steadtler
"There is another I like that is simply called "Artificial Intelligence", but it is at work so I can't give you the correct authors right now...
I was going to recommend that one, it's written by Luger and published by Addison Wesley. If that's not the one you were recommending, well, I certainly would.

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