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2 Fresh 4 U

Programming : The next Generation!!

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as obvious as it is technology and games have improved alot over the years. And more people are starting to work in the game industry. For you people already in the industry and others,Do you get try to make something new and fresh or do programmers have to just stick to whatever their company tells them to do.Because I also wanted to program not only games but games that are better in every way. So can anyone tell me can you make something new or be on a team designed to make something new for the next generation of gamer's[attention][attention][repost]

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It depends on the company...

If you work at a big company like Blizzard, you'll code whatever their designers tell you to code, but if you're at a more flexible company like flagship you'd have a good chance of having some creative input...

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Quote:
Original post by 2F4U
Do you get try to make something new and fresh or do [you] have to just stick to whatever [your] company tells [you] to do.Because I ... want... to program... games that are better ... can you make something new or be on a team designed to make something new ...

It's a good thing you mentioned the team, because it means you recognize the importance of teamwork. You understand that what you work on is whatever the team is working on. Being part of a team means you can't just go off and work on whatever you feel like. The team is depending on you to support the team effort fully.

As a team member, you get a voice, but unless you are the team leader (and the person footing all the bills for the project), you don't have a say.

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This is a good question to ask as I believe most programmers get into the industry with something else in mind.

If you joined the industry as a programmer it would be rare that you get to work on your own game creation. It will typically always be someone elses design.

As an entry level programmer you are also typically given a lot of guidance about how to develop particular components or software. So it can be less creative but as time goes on you will find you are given more and more slack to architect theses pieces yourself, especially if you specialize in something.

For example if you are asked to design the AI software for a game, then obviously you would work with game designers to gather requirements, but implementation would ultimately be something you'd figure, possibly with your peers.

This is typically as creative as it gets for most people nowadays, although of course if you do get to the top of the programming tree you might be dictating how everyone is to work on your engine.

If you really do want to create your own games, then do consider independent game development or non-professional, hobbyist approaches. On the other hand don't overlook the advantages that working in a team based environment can offer. You can still innovate and show leadership as a team member.


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While it's true that unless you're paying the bills (or are put in charge by the people that do), you don't have a say, it definately doesn't mean you can't have important creative feedback, or convince the person/people in charge that your idea is worth investing in (I've helped guide lots of features and game design isn't anywhere in my job description).

Getting to do things you want include is achievable only in the following ways (or any combination of them):

-Keep a friendly and constructive relationship with game designers, not just other programmers. Working with designers and going back and forth with ideas is a great way to get designers to trust you to deliver what they want, and for them to realise that you also have valuable input into the game. The better this relationship becomes, the more likely they'll not only consider your advice, but they'll also seek your advice.

-Being the best programmer you can be. Show your leads/producers/managers that you can get stuff done. Deliver your work on time. Deliver quality work. And help the designers and producers iterate on the work to produce the best game possible. When you get the reputation of someone who gets things done, you'll start to get more and more difficult tasks (more often than not in your particular areas of interest). If no one trusts you, or you have a bad track record, then why would they trust you with "Super cool new thing".

-Last option is to show that you can get things done before you even get the job. If you want to work on some crazy tech, or have ideas for amazing game mechanics, build them yourself and use them in a portfolio. If you've done similar work in the past, then you have a better chance of getting fast-tracked to a position requiring you to build these types of things.






Personally I feel that all three are very important, and should be best practices for all programmers, but that might just be me.

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