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DrNorrisMD

starting c#/.net, 1.0, 2.0, or 3.0?

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my friend and i have decided to delve into C# development, learn the .net framework, etcetera. we know next to nothing about the two, and are having trouble deciding where to start. my friend seems to think it would be wise to start off using an older version of visual studio with the older version of C#, get a solid foundation in the language, and then, at a later time, learn the new features implemented in the later versions. the main problem is that i already have a fairly solid programming background, using visual basic, php, sql, javascript, and other, "lighter" languages. learning a new language, at least until i get into the more complicated subject matter, has always been simply learning the syntax to do things i already know how to do. so besides the simplicity of "easing yourself into programming," are there any benefits to learning earlier versions first? if there are benefits to learning older versions first, do they truely outweigh the extra time and effort invested in doing so? thanks in advance for any insight you guys can give me.

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No, you should use the most up-to-date version that you can. Since Visual Studio 2008 Express is free for anyone and everyone, it only makes sense to use an older version if you already have a project that can't be upgraded. Even if you want to target an older version of the framework, the new Visual Studio will allow you to do so.

Learning an older version means that you could potentially learn features that are either removed, deprecated, or just plain no longer used in future versions. Other possibilities include new language features that are important to the future of the language. A few examples I can think of have to do with the upgrade from C# 1 to C# 2, such as the addition of generics, which was an extremely important addition to the language.

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my thanks for the quick reply, guys! this is pretty much the same sentiment i was having. we just wanted to get some advice from more experienced people before investing a lot of time in this project.

as a follow up; ive been reading posts here that talk about how very many C# books have begun to spring up, and how very few of them are actually good. looking at the huge stack of programming books on my desk, i can attest to the glut of horribly written, typo-filled horrors.

so, would you guys mind giving me the gamedev.net version of the C# "oprah book club?"

as always, thanks in advance.

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The O'Reilly books (programming C#, Learning C#) are fine. You're probably best off going to a book store and reading through a little of each to see what level best suits you.

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Quote:
Original post by Diosces
Programming IDE:I suggest Microsoft C# 2008 Express which is free.
Literature: O'Reilly's Head First C# , the best technical book I've had the pleasure of reading.

Good luck

I second those suggestions and the book is one of the first to cover the new 3.0 additions to C#.

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