Jump to content
  • Advertisement
Sign in to follow this  
elgintidus

Requirements of a Game Programmer

This topic is 3809 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

If you intended to correct an error in the post then please contact us.

Recommended Posts

I'm going into high school and career questions and possibilities are going through my mind when I'm thinking of picking my classes. I have a real passion for videos game (mainly MMORPGs runescape) and I thought that a career in game programming would be very challengeing and interesting. Over the years I've tried several books (all very expensive) like game programming for teens and they always came with defuctional software and/or crappy explanations that were really really compliecated, which i kind of expected. So i guess my main question is do you have to know how to program before going into a game design or game programming school? And do you know of any quality books that might be able to teach game programming without leaveing me totaly confused?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Advertisement
Two things.

1: Nobody gives a damn what classes you took in high school, and no one ever will.
2: Going to a game design/programming school is a total waste of your time and money.

If you want to make games, go make games. Technical competence will get you much farther than second rate classes offered as the local fad.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Please read this: http://www.gamedev.net/reference/business/features/degree/

It's an excellent answer for your question

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by Promit
Two things.

1: Nobody gives a damn what classes you took in high school, and no one ever will.
2: Going to a game design/programming school is a total waste of your time and money.


1. I don't see how that answers his question. But thanks for sharing anyway.
2. This is just an opinion, and a pretty ill-informed one.

Quote:
So i guess my main question is do you have to know how to program before going into a game design or game programming school?


No, it's not a requirement. But it will certainly help. Most importantly, stay awake in your math and physics courses.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Take what you're interested in. Promit's right; your high school courses are entirely insignificant as courses by the time you are looking for your first (real, post-college) job -- what they ultimately teach you in terms of fundamentals might be, but those classes are usually required anyway. Similarly, your college courses start to become irrelevant after you're looking for your nth job. It's important you chose to study things you are interested in (as much as you can, given the tendency towards strict regimentation of education in high school in the US, at least), they make you a more interesting, less shallow, person.

As for "game schools," here are my thoughts. It's still quite early for you to be considering colleges, but if you are actually interested in doing what you need to do to become a good game developer, you should understand that "game schools" are certainly not required to get in the industry and generally have very little impact one way or the other. As such, you should strive to consider all your options when it is time -- at least as far as game programming goes, that means including "regular" computer science schools.

All in all though, if you're just getting into high school, I'd spend less time worrying about your future career and more time trying to enjoy yourself.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by Promit
Two things.

1: Nobody gives a damn what classes you took in high school, and no one ever will.
2: Going to a game design/programming school is a total waste of your time and money.

If you want to make games, go make games. Technical competence will get you much farther than second rate classes offered as the local fad.


I can't tell you how irritated I get when I hear these accusations.

I attend such a school and the training is more rigorous than you could imagine. It's been said a million times... a college is a vehicle. Where and how far you go in that vehicle is your choice alone.

Please stop stereotyping these degrees. Some are not so great and some are SUPERB.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by induster
I attend such a school and the training is more rigorous than you could imagine. It's been said a million times... a college is a vehicle. Where and how far you go in that vehicle is your choice alone.
The rigor of the coursework is not in question. Of people who routinely toss out the resumes of people coming out of Digipen and Fullsail and the like, rather, the most common complaint I've heard is that the coursework lacks breadth. Sure, anybody graduating from one of those places can program an A* pathfinder, implement shadow volumes, etc., because those are standard "game programming" things. But ask them to demonstrate that a proposed multithreaded server design is deadlock-free, or come up with an O(n log n) algorithm for optimal content partitioning, or any other theory-heavy task, and they're much more a fish out of water than the average CS graduate.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
There must be a place for both types of educations... I won't argue it anymore though. This has been brought up a million times and I just simply have to believe in myself. If I don't learn multi-threading design in school I'll do it on my own.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
A bit premature on the trade school debate, perhaps? This kid is going into high school!

I don't know if this pertains to your question, but I'd disagree with jpetrie that your high school curriculum is not important. I doubt that any but the most insane employer will even glance at it, but it really matters as to where you get into college. I don't know about trade schools, but many of the nation's best computer science programs will require a decent high school course schedule.

I highly recommend the AP Computer Science course, if your school offers it. Not only does it look good for colleges, but it's an excellent starter for both programming and theory. Oh, and math. Take lots of math.

High school aside, it's important to make games, or do something game-related in your free time. I have personally learned almost everything I know from the web, but you have to find something that works for you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:

but I'd disagree with jpetrie that your high school curriculum is not important.

That isn't what I said; I said that the courses you take in high school are irrelevant as bullet points (e.g., on a resume) by the time you start looking for your first job out of college. I agree with the rest of your post; they can be useful for getting into college. But I still stand primarily by my original statement that it's most important to take things that one finds appealing, as much as one is able, rather than to try to tailor ones coursework too heavily to "what they'll be looking for."

You only get to spend eight hours of your day getting educated once, for the most part. Enjoy it while you can.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

  • Advertisement
×

Important Information

By using GameDev.net, you agree to our community Guidelines, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy.

We are the game development community.

Whether you are an indie, hobbyist, AAA developer, or just trying to learn, GameDev.net is the place for you to learn, share, and connect with the games industry. Learn more About Us or sign up!

Sign me up!