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Technology or Game Engine???

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Hi all, I like to learn game programming, now I'm learning DirectX. But what do you recommend me? (1) To learn a technology like DirectX or OpenGL. (2) To learn a game engine like panda3D, or Ogre(for rendering), or some others. I'm studiing Computer Sciencies and i would like to work in game programming, tell me about what is more convenient for me. I'm in Argentina and here haven't game programming's enterprises. Thanks for answers :)

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Its hard to just arbitrarily make a recommendation between those two choices without knowing more about your situation, but really off the cuff: #1, learn DirectX and once your know a bit look at some open source game engines to learn more, and so on.

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Thanks for answer, my situation is

I have 21 years old, I'm in 4th year of Computer Sciencies.
I'm a strong C programmer and a very good C++ programmer.
In Argentina haven't game programming's enterprises. I need to move to other country or work in the internet.
Actually i'm learning:
(a) C++
(b) DirectX
(c) 3D Math

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Quote:
Original post by Nikko_Bertoa
Hi all, I like to learn game programming, now I'm learning DirectX. But what do you recommend me?

(1) To learn a technology like DirectX or OpenGL.
(2) To learn a game engine like panda3D, or Ogre(for rendering), or some others.

I'm studiing Computer Sciencies and i would like to work in game programming, tell me about what is more convenient for me.
I'm in Argentina and here haven't game programming's enterprises.

Thanks for answers :)




Knowing how to use the graphics interfaces can be useful for non-game related jobs, so that would be useful to make you more versatile.

The game engines are much more specialized in usage -- both that most other programming jobs wont use them and even each specific engine is used by only a fraction of the game companies.

The graphics libtraries will get you into the fine details (lower level programming) needed to create visual applications, and the game engines are at a somewhat higher level. So you need to decide which direction you want to go.

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Your a, b, and c indexes for learning indicate to me that you should just develop using DirectX and C++. :)

I'd look at game engines if the situation was more like, I want to make game X and make it now. You should more like you are trying to increase your own understanding of the process and build skill, so using a game engine won't help you as much there.

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You have reason Jason. I think that what most pleased me as a programmer is to understand at a low level what I am doing.
Looking in Game Jobs I saw that many game companies need C++ programmers with strong experience in graphical programming, I do not understand what is referred to with graphical programming, i.e. API, Engine, others things

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Quote:
Original post by wodinoneeye
Knowing how to use the graphics interfaces can be useful for non-game related jobs, so that would be useful to make you more versatile.

The gap is narrowing, though. I recently read about an architectural firm building their new visualization tool on... wait for it... Unreal Engine 3. The benefit to them is that it already has comprehensive input handling and character movement simulation, making walk-throughs a breeze to generate. Add the integrated partners program and UE3 was a better option for them than building it from the ground up in OpenGL.

I suspect that, over time, you will find more and more general-purpose multimedia applications taking advantage of technology originally created for games, especially as games technology is refined to support a broader array of genres (e.g., UE3 has been used to develop far more than just FPSes).

Nevertheless, at this point in time it is still more valuable to learn the baseline graphics libraries. Eventually, knowledge of those libraries will become more and more of a specialty niche, but that time has not yet come.

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Oluseyi what do you mean by :

"Nevertheless, at this point in time it is still more valuable to learn the baseline graphics libraries. Eventually, knowledge of those libraries will become more and more of a specialty niche, but that time has not yet come."


Do you recommend me DirectX or OpenGL? (thinking in the future)
or what do you recommend me?

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