• Advertisement
Sign in to follow this  

Working from home for another country

This topic is 3627 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

If you intended to correct an error in the post then please contact us.

Recommended Posts

Hi, as we all know the main game industry is based in the USA, as i live in the Uk this could pose a problem. i know there are UK based companies such as LionHead but i am wondering if abroad companies take onboard people from other contries and allow them to work either from home or have stations based in the UK which work with them. thank you

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Advertisement
What kind of work do you do? What kind of portfolio do you have?

Telecommuting has a lot of communications issues, so it is generally avoided unless you can offer a truly unique / market lacking service.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
well i currently am in my second year at univercity doing computer games software development and i am hoping to get into the harcore programming aspects of the job. i am not sure yet specificaly though of where i want to be department wise but i am doing an asignment where i need to find out aspects of the game industry. As you said there are problems with communication do these "offices" exist though in the uk where they share project

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
One thing to bear in mind is that if you're working in the USA, you'll be paid in dollars, and the USD/GBP exchange rate is pretty crappy just now, meaning you won't be paid very much.

There's plenty of games companies in the UK though...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Highly unlikely. Even if you have something to offer that cannot be found anywhere in the US, the constraints (time zones, legal overhead and most importantly the absence of face-to-face communication) make it undesirable for a company to do so. If you would live in a place where a month's salary would only buy you a candy bar in the West, you might have a chance to get some contracting work in programming. The UK obviously is not such a country. However, the UK does has more than a decent video game industry, so it worth to try it closer to home. If you can't make it there, you won't make anywhere.*

Quote:
Original post by stecooper123
the harcore programming aspects

What is this hardcore programming you speak of?

Quote:
i am not sure yet specificaly though of where i want to be department wise

Perhaps you should find this out first then.

Quote:
Original post by stecooper123
problems with communication

I don't complain about this often, but please check your spelling.



* Frank Sinatra called, etc.....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Wow i never thought of that. thats a very good point to take into concideration though, who would you say that the major uk developers are.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by stecooper123
i am wondering if abroad companies take onboard people from other contries

Yes, international freelancing does exist. Read FAQ 63 to learn how to become a freelancer.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by stecooper123
Wow i never thought of that. thats a very good point to take into concideration though, who would you say that the major uk developers are.

Have a look for yourself: http://gamedevmap.com/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Thank you WanMaster, that map looks quite interesting, i has a quick look and i think this will be very useful. Also thank you to everyone else for your help

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Since the end of last year, I've worked as a freelancer. All my work is done online, from home... I have never met any of my clients (so far).
I live in the UK but at the moment, all my work is in the US. I actually set out to do web/application programming but have picked up a couple of big clients through GameDev, in fact my two longest-running projects are both games development.

While the $/£ rate isn't great, I still earn more than I would doing game/application development as an employee in the UK.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by stecooper123
Hi, as we all know the main game industry is based in the USA, as i live in the Uk this could pose a problem.
Not in the least. There is a very strong development industry in the UK and many global best sellers were developed here.

Quote:
i know there are UK based companies such as LionHead but i am wondering if a broad companies take onboard people from other contries and allow them to work either from home or have stations based in the UK which work with them.

Do overseas companies hire individuals to telecommute? Yes.
Will an overseas company hire a newly graduated student with no industry experience to such a position? Almost certainly not.

Working freelance is fun but very challenging. It requires that you be very motivated to go and find work and also requires that you have something to offer the employer beyond what they can get with an in-house employee. There are far too many entry level/graduates trying to get into the industry and that would make it very unlikely that you would stand out from the crowd. It is also unlikely that you would have anything like enough contacts in the industry to get work.

In my opinion you would be far better off getting an in-house position in one of the many, many UK studios in order to actually get some industry experience and shipped games on your CV - plus making lots of contacts while your at it. Once you have done that you would be in a far better position should you wish to freelance.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hey,

I've taken to PixelCubed quite well, they offered me a job in the art department and so far its a great experience, the current project isnt over the top and the team is really nice to work with.

At the moment they are not considered a proper studio, but plans are to become one within 2 years.

Check out this website:
KingdomOfOld.co.uk

Thanks their current project, their company website is being re-hosted at the moment so thats the best place to call.

Good luck finding a company!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I've found that if you want to go into casual or cell-phone games, you have OK odds of getting a work-from-home gig. More so with artists than with programmers, though, and you definitely have to know the right people to even find out about places that do this.

Cheers,
--Brian

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Working from home is quite possible, regardless of your location. What really matters is how well (and fast) can you produce the content they need. Also, are you looking for a steady job, or contract work? Finding contract work should be easy, but getting a steady gig that allows you to work from home is harder.

I've been able to work out of my home on numerous projects, even some large publisher titles like Nintendo and Atari. I have my own studio, so many times it is easier for a developer to contract out a composer-sound designer with their own gear. This way the company doesn't have to order any gear or software and the freelancer works with a setup he knows well. It takes a good discipline to work from home and some people can't do it. I have some peers that would much rather work in the office because they can get too distracted working out of home. For me, it goes either way. I'm fine working at home and equally fine working in-house. The major pro to working in-house is the face to face interaction, of course.

Landing a freelancing job is a bit of luck and plenty of networking and hard work. I've been pretty lucky to get all of the work I've had over the past years. I started with zero contacts, zero game development experience and a passion for games.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

  • Advertisement