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Developing an RPG - opinions needed

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Hello people. Currently I'm developing an RPG, independently. This RPG will be somewhat different from the usual RPGs we can find nowadays. It will have the following features : 1. 25 roles/classes which work together building a society. 2. More than 70 action effects which compose hundreds of game action used in interaction, battle, socialization, trade, and others. 3. More than 100 characters, each with it’s own unique background and characteristic. 4. NPCs which all have full role in the game, just like the PC. 5. More than 30 types of creature, each with it’s own characteristic. 6. A real-time action system which open the door for action timing strategy. 7. More than 30 clans and 10 factions, each with it’s own characteristic and relation to each others. 8. A real-time socialization system which is based on information distribution. 9. AI which performs actions accurately based on the characteristic of the NPC’s class or the creature's type. Firstly, I need your opinions/thoughts on these matters/questions : 1. Judging from the features described before, can the game draw your interest, and how interested will you be? 2. If you're interested, which features interest you the most? 3. If the game includes minimal "eye-candy" (to the point that it looks almost like a regular application instead of a game application), will the game still interest you? 4. If so, how much the suitable price for it would be? If anyone want to throw some comments/critiques/questions about the features, feel free to do so. I might describe the features in details, if you're interested. Thanks in advance for any replies.

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Bullet-point lists with big numbers and impressive features are the things of big commercial games designed to get people to buy the game.

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So you mean, I should say that my game will have 10000 characters instead of 100, 3000 types of creature instead of 30, 2500 roles instead of 25, and so on?

:D

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1) "More than 70 action effects" or "25 roles/classes which work together" doesn't interest me if I don't know what they are ;)
If I saw a list of them, and could see how the interaction between these different effects creates an interesting game-play environment, then I might be interested. Remember that some of the greatest games of all time have very few options/actions, but the way that they interact creates a great game!

2) This one interests me: "A real-time socialization system which is based on information distribution."
From some of the oblivion hype, I was lead to believe that oblivion would have such a system, and I was quite disappointed when it didn't...

3) Yes.
4) Free, with an optional donation. People who make a donation should be given something special. E.g. "Lord" on the front of their name, or extra items, or some gold, or a better way of getting in-game information.

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Quote:
Original post by wirya
1. Judging from the features described before, can the game draw your interest, and how interested will you be?

The magnitude of elements included in a game is not something that usually impresses me. Some of the key concepts you mentioned would sound favorable to me if I were to read it without paying attention to all of those 'more than's.

Quote:
2. If you're interested, which features interest you the most?

Real-time, and the fact that AI is modeled for each type of character.

Quote:
3. If the game includes minimal "eye-candy" (to the point that it looks almost like a regular application instead of a game application), will the game still interest you?

An application? That's about as minimal as it gets. I would be drawn to any well designed and balanced game, as long as there is some type of representation beyound buttons and text. It's difficult for me to even imagine real time action with buttons and text.

Quote:
4. If so, how much the suitable price for it would be?

Isn't it a little early to decide that? I mean you'll be working on this game for about 4-8 years. The stock market may collapse again before you finish.

Quote:
If anyone want to throw some comments/critiques/questions about the features, feel free to do so. I might describe the features in details, if you're interested.

To be completely honest, you didn't describe much at all about your project. Most of the features you listed are a part of any role playing game. The sheer number of types of objects and actions is not something that's very important to real gamers. What is the point of the gameplay? To survive? To grow? To conquer? To save? What will the player be doing the most of to accomplish that goal? Fighting? Conversing? Planning strategy?

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Original post by Hodgman

4) Free, with an optional donation. People who make a donation should be given something special. E.g. "Lord" on the front of their name, or extra items, or some gold, or a better way of getting in-game information.


No, never items/gold or any advantages, only aesthetic rewards are somewhat acceptable if even that. Money/Game relationship should not be related at all.

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25 roles/classes seems like an awful lot to develop each in any depth. I'd rather see a game with 4 unique deeply developed classes or races than one with 25 that you can barely tell apart.

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Quote:
Original post by wirya
1. Judging from the features described before, can the game draw your interest, and how interested will you be?
Probably not much. There are some things which I don't like in the first place. Personally I don't find this bullet list to be useful in understanding if the final thing will be good. Design-wise, as other users have suggested, this doesn't guarantee everything will end up being interesting.
Quote:
Original post by wirya2. If you're interested, which features interest you the most?
N/A for me.
Quote:
Original post by wirya3. If the game includes minimal "eye-candy" (to the point that it looks almost like a regular application instead of a game application), will the game still interest you?
Yes but define "minimal". NV1x is ok. VooDoo2 is not. 640x480 isn't good. 2D can be good.
Quote:
Original post by wirya
4. If so, how much the suitable price for it would be?
Depends if it's going to be subscription based or not. I fear you cannot go over 9.5 units of your favourite currency (even under what I think it's the highly unlikely scenario in which you hit AAA quality).
Quote:
Original post by wirya
If anyone want to throw some comments/critiques/questions about the features, feel free to do so. I might describe the features in details, if you're interested.
I appreciate the opportunity.
The first thing I don't like is the role/class system.
Role/class systems were probably introduced for easiness of management in paper-and-pencil games. Their usefulness in automated systems could be debated.
I suppose DnD and GURPS to be the big two players here (like D3D and GL ;) ) the first is widely adopted and evolved, the second is much more a slow-moving niche-like thing which allows to do wonderful things for pro players.
The GURPS ruleset intrinsically supports both build-your-class-from-skills and a lot of flexibility the other doesn't. Look at how the DnD ruleset evolved (I've had a look to 2nd->3rd->3.5) and you'll figure out they introduced alot of "feats" just to make it more flexible.

In my opinion, rule/class systems are broken. We don't have a strict rule in real life and I don't see why we should have one in the virtual reality, a thing exacerbated by the fact we can summon mystic powers to slay mythical creatures in the simulated world. I don't even see the low-level benefit, although I have to admit I don't even though at it much. Why not just to employ a flexible skill system and let everyone choose by its own?
In fact, I can some good reasons for which this shouldn't happen but I believe the problem could be tackled effectively.

The other is related to the combat system.
I appreciate that the thief slowly crawling behind a character moving on soft carpets and staying in the shadows gets a +200% hit ratio and +800% damage. What I don't think is a good idea is to require all players to take accurate aiming with their crossbow. It's something they would find difficult and I'm unsure the average PC-RPG gamer would like this.

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yeah, sounds like you just want to make what oblivion was supposed to be.

The elder scrolls has been trying to be this for quite some time. What is it exactly which sets your game apart?

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Original post by RivieraKid
What is it exactly which sets your game apart?


That was my first thought, also. Glad someone else is on the ball.

Sidenote:

Quote:
Original post by Hodgman
From some of the oblivion hype, I was lead to believe that oblivion would have such a system, and I was quite disappointed when it didn't...


I was too... [bawling]

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Quote:
Original post by wirya
3. More than 100 characters, each with it’s own unique background and characteristic.
5. More than 30 types of creature, each with it’s own characteristic.

I might describe the features in details, if you're interested.


I'm curious what those characteristics are. I hope it's not weight or color, but things like personality and behavior? And if yes, I'd like to see what you have planned for those 100 characters and 30 monster types :)

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the idea's for a game sound interesting enough

but, they wont really make a game, only giving me idea's of types of games you could make with those features

Sell the idea more, how will it look like a normal application?
like drug wars, or more eye candy then that?

Pricing is a bit of a meh issue, if it looked applicationish
and not online? (which seems a bit strange to have so many classes/roles)
id make it free, put a add banner along the bottom, sell as adware.

What id like to see, is NPC's that do progress, there not forever waiting around for you, like that oblivion game (though i couldn't get into it, wasn't enough change that i could see that directly affected me)
Which does seem to one of your goals.

You need more information, then a list, maybe take 10% of each number and describe indepth about them, what would make npc 1 diffrent to npc 5

Im sure you get the idea ^.^

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Don't mistake Complicated for Complexity

A complicated game has lots of options but relationships between those options are not deep. In a complex game the relationships between the options are deep.

For example, in chess, you have 6 different pieces (Pawn, Rook, Knight, Bishop, Queen and King) and can place them on one square on a board that is 8 x 8 squares. At any one time you might have a maximum couple of dozen choices (usually it is less than half a dozen vaild/worthwhile moves in practice) as to where and what you can move. So compared to the list you provided for your idea, Chess is not very complicated.

However...

In chess, because of the relationships between the pieces (how they can move and where they are possitionsed), it becomes an extremely deep game. In fact, modern computeres can't even calculate every single interaction of the pieces. It is that deep.

Another thing aobut complexity and complication: Humans can only handle so many choices before they can't handle any more. Humans seem to max out at around 7 options, with a typical number being around 5.

So having a choice of around 25 classes could overwhealm most players.

Howerver ther is a rescue. It is called "Chunking".

Chunking is where someone mentally groups objects or choices together. This enables them to compare many more choices at the same time.

For instance:
If you split your classes into 5 main types, each having 5 varients in each type and make this clear to the players, then this will allow them to Chunk the choices into the limit of 5.

First they would decide between the main types. Maybe these are: Striker, Defender, Ranged, General Support and Fire Support (note the might not be what you call them for the player but are just to help you understand how you might chunk them).

Then they would choose one of the subtypes, for example under General Support you might have: Healer, Buffer, Debuffer, Aggro (gets enemies attention) and Stealth (open locks, disarm traps, etc).

Of course in game you might list these as Cleric (Healer), Enchanter (Buffer), Abjurer (Debuffer), Aggro (Invoker), Rogue (Stealth). Or whatever fits you game world.

By breaking it up, you make the choice easier for the player, thye might decide that they want to play a support role character, then they can choose one of the support classes (say an Invoker).

As you might be able to see, by chunking it this way you automatically increase the depth of the game. You make it less complicated, but make it more complex.

There is more than jsut reaning this though, when you begin to chunk this way you actually limit your choices as a designer as to what you can do. It kind of restrict your thinking, but it can make a better system in the end. For instance, under the chunking it would be hard to have (without allowing multiclassing) to have a Support that was also a Striker.

Even if you don't buld chunking into you game, player will automatically do it if they get enough experience (in fact with chess, you can roughly determine how good a player is by how much and how well they chunk the game).

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Thanks for the replies, guys. I'll try to give the best reply.


About this project of mine. The goal is to develop a TRUE RPG. So, the player will really role-play. And since I believe that what defines a role is the game action set it has, so my design is focused on making a strict and efficient game action system (and therefore I'll also have to make a strict and efficient information system and other things).


Quote:
Original post by Kest
An application? That's about as minimal as it gets. I would be drawn to any well designed and balanced game, as long as there is some type of representation beyound buttons and text. It's difficult for me to even imagine real time action with buttons and text.

It'll have 2D pictures of the game objects (characters, creatures, weapons, rooms, etc). Hand-drawn. There'll be no animations. That's what I meant by "minimal eye-candy".


Quote:
Original post by Kest
To be completely honest, you didn't describe much at all about your project. Most of the features you listed are a part of any role playing game. The sheer number of types of objects and actions is not something that's very important to real gamers. What is the point of the gameplay? To survive? To grow? To conquer? To save? What will the player be doing the most of to accomplish that goal? Fighting? Conversing? Planning strategy?

Well I posted the features just to know what the reactions of people would be when I advertise it :)


Quote:
Original post by Kest
Isn't it a little early to decide that? I mean you'll be working on this game for about 4-8 years. The stock market may collapse again before you finish.

Well, I've developed some parts of the game, and my estimation the game will be finished before 2009. I have an early version of it with the early interface (looks really ugly), it can't be played yet (buggy as hell) but it shows what kind of game I'm talking about. If you guys are interested, I'll upload it.


Quote:
Original post by RivieraKid
What is it exactly which sets your game apart?

At least these aspects :
1. real-time action system, the actions will have specific STARTUP time, ACTIVE time, and RECOVERY time. Action timing strategy will play a great part here.
2. EVERYTHING you and the AI do will be a full game action, meaning that whatever kind of action it is it would be treated the same. Even the talk and trade actions will have STARTUP, ACTIVE, and RECOVERY time. So for example, there won't be a Morrowind-like talk action which when triggered it'll put the game world to a halt (you can't get hit when the dialog box is open).
3. Classes/roles which forms a solid community/society. You're a warrior and want to get your wounds treated? Go ask the healer. You're a healer and want to get some money? Tell people that you're a healer, wait in your shop (well or you can go wandering around), heal people. You're a knight who command an army of warriors and want to strike the badguys? Call the warriors, tell the healers/mages/others in the city that your army need their services, and strike 'em. You're a humble trader who happens to know that the badguys are going to kill the leader of the nation? Go and tell the royal army commander about it, and then do whatever you can to help 'em (gathering weapons, potions, armors, joining the army, etc). And such.
4. This hasn't been mentioned. There is no leveling system. The purpose of the game really isn't hunting for EXP.
5. Real-time information distribution system. You spread informations using TALK action, you gather information using LISTEN action, you can even read people's mind using spell, or use TELEPATHY action to avoid people using LISTEN action on you (of course not all classes have this action). All those actions are, like I said, full game actions, they have STARTUP, ACTIVE, and RECOVERY time, so for example you can get interrupted before you finish your TALK action. And the informations themselves would be various, it can be about alliance, about who hate who, about where a specific person is, and even about how much that particular item worths, etc.
6. The PC (Player Character) is only one at a time (you choose it from the beginning of the game), but you basically can play as any of the 100+ characters (including the badguys and even the leader of the nation). Each of the characters has a fixed class, meaning that if you want to play as another class then you'll have to switch character. Of course that (one PC at a time) doesn't mean that you'll be somewhat lonely, because you can always ask for help from the NPCs (especially if your class/role is "Nation Leader" :D ).


Quote:
Original post by sunandshadow
25 roles/classes seems like an awful lot to develop each in any depth. I'd rather see a game with 4 unique deeply developed classes or races than one with 25 that you can barely tell apart.

Well, it's actually not that hard to develop the classes. The actions in this game can have up to 4 effects. So for example, a mage can have an action which have PHYSICAL ATTACK effect, just like a warrior. But a warrior will have more various attack actions. Warrior can have a quick attack action (low damage but also doesn't require much stamina), a heavy-damaging one, a fake one (has a really quick STARTUP and RECOVERY but zero ACTIVE time), and such. Warrior can also have an action which have not only PHYSICAL ATTACK effect but also PHYSICAL GUARD effect (in this game it'll be called "Warrior's Charge"). Mages won't have that kind of action.

And since there will be more than 70 action effects (some of them are : PHYSICAL ATTACK, ENERGY ATTACK, CAST SPELL, TALK, LISTEN, MEDITATE, REST, READ, GO THROUGH, EXAMINE ROOM, EXAMINE WEAPONS, EXAMINE MENTAL, EXAMINE PHYSIC, HIDE, TRADE, CREATE ALCHEMY), developing 25 classes really isn't that hard :)


Quote:
Original post by Hajo The Dreamer

I'm curious what those characteristics are. I hope it's not weight or color, but things like personality and behavior? And if yes, I'd like to see what you have planned for those 100 characters and 30 monster types :)

For the characters, it'll be : clan (allied clan, opposing clan, rival clan, high clan, lower clan, etc), attitude (cowardly, brave, distrust foreigner, greedy, etc), goal in life (opposing government, helping government, neutral/go with the flow, etc), and such. And of course the roles/classes would have significant effect.

For the creatures, it'll be : attitude (tame or not, hard to scare, easy to scare, hate specific creatures, hate specific person, etc), intelligence (stupid, cunning, etc), and such.

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Well... I have to applaud the goal of an RPG where people actually roleplay, but I have to say I don't like this design or think it will accomplish your goal. A rigid class system is anathema to roleplay no matter how many class choices you give the player. A much better idea would be to have no classes, but instead award the player class labels based on how they build their character (either by which abilities they choose/purchase from the master list to build their character, or even better by what abilities they use most in the game (crafting, stealth, shapeshifting, damage blacking, raw firepower, long range, stunning/paralyzing opponents, maybe even building trap...), and give them bonuses which suit their build, quest rewards or unlocking new abilities (as well as customizing appearance lol). Make it free and easy for the player to rebuild their character at any time, or make a max level character able to afford/have all abilities.

Then if you have time and energy left you could put your categorizing and detail into race/species choices which would each have unique personalities and quest lines.

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Quote:
Original post by wirya
About this project of mine. The goal is to develop a TRUE RPG. So, the player will really role-play. And since I believe that what defines a role is the game action set it has, so my design is focused on making a strict and efficient game action system (and therefore I'll also have to make a strict and efficient information system and other things).
I don't think you can do that in a PC-RPG. A human brain is required to process this kind of complexity.
Quote:
Original post by wirya
It'll have 2D pictures of the game objects (characters, creatures, weapons, rooms, etc). Hand-drawn. There'll be no animations. That's what I meant by "minimal eye-candy".
I don't know why but I find this interesting. Like an evolved MUD. Sounds nice.
Quote:
Original post by wirya
3. Classes/roles which forms a solid community/society. You're a warrior and want to get your wounds treated? Go ask the healer. You're a healer ... You're a knight ... You're a humble trader ...
Uhm, this sounds like lot of work. Implementing this isn't going to be easy, the mechanics are way complex and unless you script everything (implying there would be only pre-defined scenarios) this feature alone would be overkill.
Quote:
Original post by wirya
For the characters, it'll be : clan (allied clan, opposing clan, rival clan, high clan, lower clan, etc), attitude (cowardly, brave, distrust foreigner, greedy, etc), goal in life (opposing government, helping government, neutral/go with the flow, etc), and such. And of course the roles/classes would have significant effect.
In low level terms, the "clan" or "opposing clan" property isn't significantly different from the "color" or "weight" property. I suppose each clan is going to be a runtime token and a few checks are going to be run on sight or higher-level routines.
Take for example the "goal in life" property. This won't come out of silicon by itself and this implies there will be some kind of switch somewhere... have fun debugging weird behaviours that shouldn't happen (Neverwinter Nights' "disappearing orcs" bug is historical)!

I understand this is a "design" forum but when you write your ideas, do you take in consideration the work required to implement them in a way emergent complexity is considered "interesting"? It's part of the design as well. Putting togheter all your ideas isn't trivial.

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Quote:
Original post by sunandshadow
A much better idea would be to have no classes, but instead award the player class labels based on how they build their character (either by which abilities they choose/purchase from the master list to build their character, or even better by what abilities they use most in the game (crafting, stealth, shapeshifting, damage blacking, raw firepower, long range, stunning/paralyzing opponents, maybe even building trap...), and give them bonuses which suit their build, quest rewards or unlocking new abilities (as well as customizing appearance lol).

I agree. Earning a title is also much more rewarding and meaningful than choosing one from a list when the game starts. You could still give the player class-like rewards or bonuses after they reach certain titles. To make it even more interesting as a gameplay concept, the number of classes (or titles) should be hidden from the player, as well as the details of how to obtain them. You could have very unique classes that require extreme specialization to obtain, giving players a lot of incentive to experiment, and raising the replay value considerably.

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Wirya , have you ever programmed any video game before ?
I'm currently developing a 2d game with animated characters.
I have a powerful machine with latest video card and tech.
And when I try to select many entities ( >50 ) the frame rate slows down.
My project uses only Direct X/C++ , no SDL only mere Direct X...
It means that I must afford a lot of code optimization...

I would suggest you to start a simple game before considering a sophisticated one.
Can you give us the proof of your successfully finished game ?

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Quote:
Original post by HolyGrail
I have a powerful machine with latest video card and tech.
And when I try to select many entities ( >50 ) the frame rate slows down.
My project uses only Direct X/C++ , no SDL only mere Direct X...
It means that I must afford a lot of code optimization...

Code optimization will only help a very little. Most of the dramatic improvements of video game performance is in finding clever ways of reducing the workload. Not code-wise, but logic-wise. For example, a grid that allows objects to only perform expensive AI tests on enemies that are very close will yield huge improvements when there are many enemies, where optimizing the AI tests themselves will barely be noticable.

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It like it, except for all the numbers. The real time compound action system things sounds cool I've though about doing something similar.

I dont see anything wrong with classes, they help players to easily decide what they want to do, and its just a simplified reflection of real world limits. It all depends on how you implement it.

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Once again, thanks for the replies, guys =)

@sunandshadow :
Quote:
A rigid class system is anathema to roleplay no matter how many class choices you give the player.

I don't get your point. Why is a rigid class system an anathema to roleplay? I don't think a rigid/fixed role/class system would bring any problem. The problem won't rise from the rigidness of the roles, but rather from the unclearness of it. And in this project of mine, I try hard to make the roles as well-defined as possible.

Of course I agree that a more flexible class/role system will be in many ways better than the rigid one, but saying that the rigid system is an anathema to roleplay is quite an overkill, IMO ^^

Quote:
A much better idea would be to have no classes, but instead award the player class labels based on how they build their character (either by which abilities they choose/purchase from the master list to build their character, or even better by what abilities they use most in the game (crafting, stealth, shapeshifting, damage blacking, raw firepower, long range, stunning/paralyzing opponents, maybe even building trap...), and give them bonuses which suit their build, quest rewards or unlocking new abilities (as well as customizing appearance lol). Make it free and easy for the player to rebuild their character at any time, or make a max level character able to afford/have all abilities.

Well I think your idea is much closer to "Character Building Game", instead of "Role Playing Game". Providing the player with flexible ways to modify/build his/her character doesn't guarantee him/her to get a good role-playing experience. So in an RPG, it's the role-playing session that matters, not the character building session. And to get a good role-playing session, the "borders" between the classes/roles have to be clear. And the flexibility of the classes/roles doesn't contribute anything to the clearness of the "borders".

Let's consider this example. Suppose there's a boy who wants to be a game programmer. In other words, he wants to role-play as a game programmer. In real life, before he can role-play as a programmer, of course he has to take the sufficient education/schooling first, in order to "build his character". Now, yes the boy has to do "character building", BUT when he's doing it he's not role-playing as a game programmer yet. His role-playing session starts after he finishes his schooling, after he finishes the "character building". So what I'm saying here is the "character building" and the "role-playing" have their own separate sessions. You don't suppose that when I'm in the middle of choosing my character's class and race and such I'm already "role-playing", do you? Just how am I going to role-play when the "role" itself isn't even defined yet?



@Krohm :
Quote:
I don't think you can do that in a PC-RPG. A human brain is required to process this kind of complexity.

Err, why is that?

Quote:
I don't know why but I find this interesting. Like an evolved MUD. Sounds nice.

Glad you find it interesting, I hope many other people will too ^^


Quote:
Uhm, this sounds like lot of work. Implementing this isn't going to be easy, the mechanics are way complex and unless you script everything (implying there would be only pre-defined scenarios) this feature alone would be overkill.

Well until now I don't find it to be that hard to implement. Basically, what I have to do is developing a nice information processing and distribution system. So, for example, suppose that John Doe the Warrior has these informations :
1. Billy is a Healer.
2. Billy lives in New York.
3. A Healer can help recovering Health.
4. When Health is only 10% of Max Health or less, go seek help to recover it.

So, when John Doe finds his Health to be less than 10% of his Max Health, he will check the informations he has to know what he must do, which will lead him to seek Billy in New York. And how would people know that Billy is a Healer? Simple, Billy can just use his TALK action to spread the "Billy is a Healer" information. Or he can use his WRITE action to put the information in some READING-type objects (books, pamphlets, etc), and then spread the objects around so people can use their READ action to get the information. Or some other means.

And that's that, since in my game "informations" will be similar to spells and items (meaning that it can be gathered and lost/given easily), we'll get a real-time information distribution system that supports the role-playing process nicely.

Quote:
I understand this is a "design" forum but when you write your ideas, do you take in consideration the work required to implement them in a way emergent complexity is considered "interesting"? It's part of the design as well. Putting togheter all your ideas isn't trivial.

Well yes, I take it into consideration, I really do. FYI, I'm trying to run a low-cost style of game development. Low cost (in this project I even make EVERYTHING myself), fast development time, but fresh/original concept.



@HolyGrail :
My game will not have any animations. If what I'm developing is a Final Fantasy-like one, no doubt there will be horrible slowdowns when 100+ characters act at the same time ^^

And the gameplay is actually simple. The features may be many, but they're not complex (take the action system for example, how would it be complex if ALL the actions will be treated the same no matter what). The only thing that's complex is the concepting process of the gameplay (since I need to find a nice yet simple way to model reality). The implementation of the concept itself isn't going to be complex.




@Kest :
Quote:
Code optimization will only help a very little. Most of the dramatic improvements of video game performance is in finding clever ways of reducing the workload. Not code-wise, but logic-wise. For example, a grid that allows objects to only perform expensive AI tests on enemies that are very close will yield huge improvements when there are many enemies, where optimizing the AI tests themselves will barely be noticable.

Yes, that's what I'm trying to do, reducing the workload. I'm thinking about fully processing all characters and creatures in the game, but that if I can find a fast algorithm for it. If I can't find it, then maybe only the characters and creatures in the active room that will be fully processed. All others will be processed but not individually, or individually but in a simpler way (the characters and creatures won't be as smart as they should be).

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@RivieraKid :
Well, imagine Morrowind but with real-time dialog system, real-time inventory system, and fully active NPCs.

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About classes, role playing, and character building:

We were just discussing this issue a bit in this thread actually: Does roleplaying require that the player be able to create and/or customize the character? While I believe that one _can_ roleplay a pre-created character, I agreed with the other poster there that doing so is the most limited form of roleplaying.

In your specific case you are not even talking about a pre-created, well fleshed out character with a name and a race and a personal history, you're talking about a class. So the reason I say rigid classes are anathema to roleplay is that a _class_ is not a _role_ because classes are impersonal. There is little mental or emotional involvement in being someone who's just part of a group, especially in the typical mmo where there is no real storyline, much less an interactive one, and no relationship building with npcs beyond quests and faction rep grinding.

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Quote:
Original post by wirya
1. 25 roles/classes which work together building a society.

Flowchart it. I hope you'll tie this into the social stratification system described below.

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3. More than 100 characters, each with it’s own unique background and characteristic.

Character development? Narrative? Nonlinearity in character interaction?

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7. More than 30 clans and 10 factions, each with it’s own characteristic and relation to each others.

Flowchart it.

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8. A real-time socialization system which is based on information distribution.

If you dig out things like Shannon Entropy and Mutual Information to describe the dynamics, I'll be more than impressed. Still, flowchart it to get a very clear idea of where everything is going. And don't overlook the fact that socialization implies economy and some level of stratification.

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Firstly, I need your opinions/thoughts on these matters/questions :
1. Judging from the features described before, can the game draw your interest, and how interested will you be?

All depends upon implementation and breadth, amigo.

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2. If you're interested, which features interest you the most?

If you pull off socialization and information dynamics modelled on actual academic research, I'll be more than impressed.

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3. If the game includes minimal "eye-candy" (to the point that it looks almost like a regular application instead of a game application), will the game still interest you?

It depends on how compelling it is. FreeCol looks like crap and can keep me in front of the monitor for hours.

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4. If so, how much the suitable price for it would be?

Depends on the final product, really. Keep in mind that Dwarf Fortress is one of the most expansive and detailed city-builders around and its absolutely free.

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