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robertusrex

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Previously a lot of my experience has been with programming websites and game design, but I am looking to start programming games myself. I have prior experience with the Game Maker software, but want to do something more 'professional'. I was wondering what language people would recommend, I would be looking to make 2d games, possibly moving to mmorpgs, still 2d, when I have enough experience with the language. I have some knowledge of javascript if this sways your recommendation. Thanks in advance, Robert.

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I'll give it a try.

You could start by using a high level language that abstracts things like memory management. Python is used by many newcomers (and not only new) around here.
Once you have the fundaction running you can "speed up" things by moving portions of your code to C/C++.

It all depends on your background also.

Hope it helps

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Thanks, I was thinking I would probably go for something like Python or Java, but I looked at some Java (from a tutorial on this site) and got rather disheartened! I'll have a look at Python. I know that certain languages only run on certain OSs *Microsoft*, so are there any problems like this?

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I know that certain languages only run on certain OSs *Microsoft*, so are there any problems like this?

If you're thinking of C#... you're wrong.

I'll second Python as a good choice, though.

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Java is not a difficult language, you've been reading the wrong tutorials, if you think it is, and there are a lot of resources for it. The standard Java2D API is quite good for making 2D games, even real time games with rather impressive graphical effects, especially if you remember to switch on the 3D acceleration. You've got facilities for loading all kinds of image formats, playing sounds is easy, etc. All of that is part of the standard package and it's also quite well documented.

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I like to recommend C as a starter language. It's very simple to learn (there are millions of excellent free tutorials online), yet very powerful at the same time. Once you're proficient in it, you can pretty much do anything you could ever dream of, which includes learning other languages if you need to. It's not platform independent, but code is very portable. Virtually all games nowadays are written in C++, not because it's an arbitrary standard, but because it really is what you want to be using for maximum performance and ease of programming in one package.

As for cross-platform compatibility... Hrmm... Hate to sound like a downer, but gamers are on Windows... If you make a game cross platform, you'll be really lucky if more than 1% of your customers are on linux or mac... It's not that they don't make excellent gaming platforms; it's just that the market is what it is, and most game developers view them as a waste of time (unless they have a religious reason to think otherwise). Linux and mac users also know in advance that their choices will be very limited. I personally wouldn't bother.

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I like to recommend C as a starter language. It's very simple to learn
Something as simple as user input can become very tricky in C. C is an example of a difficult language. it's only simple if the most one does is ridiculously trivial programs. Which aren't real world robust anyway (I'm guessing no one checks for errors on user input, etc. in the basic programs).

Quote:
yet very powerful at the same time
I wish people would define powerful. It's tempting to distill choosing between languages into simple evaluators like "power" but, practically it's a useless term in programming.

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Once you're proficient in it, you can pretty much do anything you could ever dream of,
Like string manipulation. Pity those fools who use Perl and Python and shell scripts to do work. They just need to use C.

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It's not platform independent, but code is very portable.
The language is not platform dependent. Try going on the C usenet lists and asking a platform specific question. You'll be sent off with a curt explanation.

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Virtually all games nowadays are written in C++, not because it's an arbitrary standard, but because it really is what you want to be using for maximum performance and ease of programming in one package.
Another vague statement. "Performance" and "ease of programming". The usual flamewar statement is that C triumphs C++ in performance (not necessarily true). And I don't think you'll get a consensus on C++ as easy to program in.

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Wow, thanks for the response guys.

mystb - Thanks, I'll take a look but the comment oler1s made about 'Pity those fools who use... Python... to do work' rather put me off.

jpetrie - i was actually thinking of VBScript, not knowing much more about 'proper' progamming languages than their names.

SnotBob - Thanks, I was rather thinking of Java, I'll have another look around.

kiwibonga - I'll have a look at C as well. I come from an open source, albeit on Windows, background, but agree with your sentiments. I was just thinking that if there was a choice between two otherwise equal languages and one went cross OS and the other one didn't then I might as well go for the first.

oler1s - Thanks for your comments, it certainly seems to have put a first negative mark by many languages!

I'll look around and see what tutorials are on offer.

Thanks again.

[Edited by - robertusrex on April 3, 2008 4:21:01 AM]

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Virtually all games nowadays are written in C++

A hell of a lot of very good, if small, games are written in ActionScript (Flash) these days. That might not be a bad platform to start with, if you're more into designing games than programming them.

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