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Clan Destiny

The importance of DDraw Palettes when using 24bpp?

4 posts in this topic

Your assumption about true color is correct. That's why 8bpp and below are called palettized modes .

As far as the images go, are you using the DX blit routines or your own?

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I'm using the DX blit routines for now. Those should work good enough for what I'm doing right now.

I'll look for my code snippet later and post it. Fortunately on Monday I'll be moving to San Jose, CA. There isn't a very large talent pool to draw from here in Mid-Michigan when it comes to programming....

-Marc

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If you see something that is ordered like nice wavy lines,
I would guess that you don't have your surface pointers and
pitches setup correctly.

If you see something that is random garbage, it usually means
you are blitting a surface that has not been initialized with
good data.

Heh, Michigan is automotive hell. Definitely not a melting pot
for real programmers.

Reaver

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I'm presently experimenting with DirectX 7, and I'm unable to find any useful information regarding the DX palettes.

For one thing, I am writing for 640x480x24, however the palette functions seem to have settings for 8bpp and below, but nothing for 24bpp that I'm using. That leads me to the logical assumption that since I'm working with true-color I shouldn't have to worry about palettes, right? (Since all colors should be available to me.)

However, one thing that I am having trouble with is when I work with a full screen/full color bitmap, I get some odd color artifacts that run through it.

To give you a better idea of the artifacts I am seeing let me describe it a little better: What I am seeing are vertical streaks that go from the top of the image to the bottom image and they are spaced roughly about 75-100 pixels apart horizontally.

Is anyone else familiar with these artifacts? They are really quite annoying, and my development has been kinda stalled while I am attempting to locate the cause.

Any help would be appreciated.

Thanks,

Marc

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Well, when I went looking for my source code I remembered that I had deleted what I had at the time with the intent to eventually re-code it. However, this time when I rewrote the code and compiled it, it worked.

Not sure what was going on the last time. I kinda wish I still had that code so I could compare the two and find out where I went astray.

The only thing that I know for sure I did differently this time around is that I used the LoadImage function from the Windows API to load the bitmap instead of using the DDLoadBitmap that is in the ddutil.cpp file.

There was probably just something with the DDLoadBitmap call that I was doing wrong. After all, I did write it on a flight from Chicago to San Jose. I was probably too distracted by the aftertaste of the airline food to think straight. (Hey! Maybe that will be my next game! You're stuck on an airline, and you have to grab the stewardess that has the Diet Coke, while avoiding the ones with the food, BUT, to make it more interesting, you get bonus points for finding the hidden pacifiers and giving them to the screaming babies! Hmm... on second thought... maybe I should just finally get some sleep and dream happy dreams about my code working correctly.)

But anyway, thanks to all who replied. It's good to know theres a place I can go if I'm stumped.

-Marc

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