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D-Ray

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I have a question. My son has just finished his first year of college as a music/history major. Instead of continuing down that road he is wanting to start taking online courses for game art design from Westwood Tech. I have been on their website but would like an independent point of view. What I would like from folks in your community is what you know about this and the job oppotunities and do the companies give the same consideration to online students as they do to students that actually were in the class room. If this is not a good forum to find out what I'm needing to know any suggestions would be appreciated. Thanks in advance

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As a supplemental to his "real" major that he just finished a year of they might be useful to him, but as a replacement... probably not. Such programs are generally viewed with either apathy (e.g., no advantage to more traditional, non-game-specific courses of study) or look down upon (e.g., a disadvantage). It is relatively rare that they are considered advantageous.

What does your son think he wants to do as a career? If he's interested in 'game design' then history and music are excellent choices of study as they will provide broad, liberal bases of experience upon which one can draw on for inspiration and reference material.

If he's interested in art he should consider taking real art classes -- traditional art skills (drawing, painting, color theory, et al) are often very important to employers when they look for artists.

"Game art design" sounds like some course of study that teaches one how to use Max or Maya. That's not all one needs to know to be successful, though. Frequently it's not nearly enough.

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I am merely a student, but a real life university totally trumps an online one. I learn 90% outside of class, either through competitions or just hanging out with one of the professors.

Is there any reason he can't take art design in a regular university i.e. the one he is in now?

Someone with a meaningful opinion will reply soon though, so it might be best to ignore me.

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The university he is currently attending does not teach these courses. He is not interested in continuing in music or history. Funny as I'm typing this there is an ad for the college near the top of the screen.

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Quote:
Original post by D-Ray
The university he is currently attending does not teach these courses. He is not interested in continuing in music or history. Funny as I'm typing this there is an ad for the college near the top of the screen.
Probably should look into transferring schools (that is, to another real university, not an online one), then?

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D-Ray wrote:
>what you know about this

What we know about what, exactly? Westwood's online "game art design" course? I think the more important question is "is your son an artist?" If he's constantly creating imagery, then an art degree is where he should be going rather than the program he started in.

>and the job oppotunities

That depends on your son's artistic ability.

>and do the companies give the same consideration to online students as they do to students that actually were in the class room.

Read my articles 34 and 44 on my website. Nobody cares where an art applicant got his education. They only care about the quality of his portfolio.

By the way, it concerns me that you're the one who's seeking information about your son's college choice. If he has a passion for a course of study, he ought to be here asking this stuff. I can't help but wonder about his motivation, his level of passion.

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