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AzzaMat

Computer game software

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Hey i was wondering what software is used to make a relatively advanced game. i currently have 3DS max 9 and am going to be getting the havok engine. what else would i need? thanks for any responses

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The ability to search for this information would be a start. These threads are created on a weekly basis it's not hard to search for similar threads.

Secondly neither of the tools you have mentioned will allow you to create a game.

3D Studio Max is a tool for authoring 3d models and content etc. However this is useless you are capable of exporting to a format that your GAME ENGINE uses.

Secondly Havok is a Physics API, which is not freely available and unless you have very deep pockets I am intrigued how you have managed to aquire both max and havok with no knowledge of what they are for.

Without a game engine neither of the tools you have mentioned will be of any use to you, (Unless you are planning on writing your own OGL/DX engine and your own model importer), however It doesnt sound like you are any where near that level otherwise you would have a better grasp of the tools required.

So basically, you need a game engine, or game creation framework and you need to be capabale of programming within that framework in order to implement your game mechanics etc.

However I would advise against all of this and start teaching yourself the fundamentals of programming before you try and dive any deeper.

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I know what 3DS max does. i dont have the havok engine yet but it is going to be released for free to the public if you check the website. also isnt havok an engine? if im right it deals with physics, behavior, animation, cloth and destruction. i have searched for this information but i would like to be able to get more detailed information. E.g. what music software should be used. as your interested you can aquire 3DS max for only £200 or so if you are a student which i am. i am definately not at that level yet though i would love to be. i am just interested in the software used. thank you for your input. any more would be apreciated.

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A physics engine is just part of a larger system. You need much more code to make the game itself. Pretty much every 'relatively advanced' game has thousands of man-hours spent on writing a bespoke program that specifies the game.

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So your saying an advanced game isnt built with one engine, but with many? i always thought that only one was used. so what other engines are used apart from the physics engine.

thanks for the response

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Well, think about how crysis would look with only the physics, without anything being drawn to the screen :-p pretty difficult to play too.

Hoavk is just a PHYSICS engine, I haven't used it myself but I would assume it can handle deformation of your meshes, do all the collision detection and realistic simulations of physics for you.

But, then you need a rendering engine to draw your nicely positioned meshes to the screen with all the fancy effects which are so coveted today.

Of course, a game would be no fun if all of the environemt simply reacts to physics, and is drawn - so you need some kind of AI engine or controller, and then you need a module to control input.

Don't forget of course a consistent interface for sound, and you really need to work out a networking protocol if you want any kind of LAN activity or, god forbid an MMORPG.

You are not going to be making a relatively advanced game any time soon. Sorry.
It is just too big. Back in the 90s, one man teams could make a cutting edge game, if the one person had mad skillz. Now, you need a 10 man team minimum to make a relatively advanced game, and most of that ten need to have experience.

However, there are far more self contained game engines, which actually deal with most of the stuff you need, I think irrlicht may be a good example, try wikipedia or googling it. (and it is free and opensource)

My advice would be to hang around gamedev for a bit. You will quickly see where hobby game development is at; specialised (but very pretty) tech demoes, and 2D or simple 3D games, made for gameplay and not for cutting edge.

What programming language were you planning on working in? If you haven't thought about that yet, you should probably stick to 3dsmax, and get good, any number of small projects would love a half-decent modeller to help them out.

Making a game is a big commitment.

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Haha. dont worry im definately not going to be doing anything that advanced. i just wanted to know what was needed in a game. what you have told me has been really useful. il try irrlicht and have a look. i havent got much programming experience anyway. the most i have made game related has been a noughts and crosses game. that you have to play against yourself. im more into 3D modelling and things like that. im just interseted in what is used in a game so when i do get to that stage im ready.

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Quote:
Original post by Mathmo
You are not going to be making a relatively advanced game any time soon. Sorry.
It is just too big. Back in the 90s, one man teams could make a cutting edge game, if the one person had mad skillz. Now, you need a 10 man team minimum to make a relatively advanced game, and most of that ten need to have experience.


Not entirely true. Check out this beauty. Many art assets are contracted, but most of the development is done by a single guy.

Anyway, an engine is not the same as a drag-and-drop game maker. It's nothing more than a library of routines and classes that expose some functionality. Most of them are complex beasts, not really suitable for beginners. So even if someone manages to gather all the software needed to create a serious game, it doesn't mean he can do it; learning how to handle the engine and write efficient code for it is a task as difficult as learning a programming language;maybe even more.

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wow that looks great. if i did try to make say a really simple game but with those style graphics. which had just one person inside a box, and all you could do was walk around that box what would i need. this is all hypothetical of course lol.

And also thanks for the replies. you have all been great :D

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Might I suggest you take a look at 3D Game Studio, theres a 30 day demo and it comes with alot of the tools:- script language, model editor and level editor and tutorials to get you on your way, plus you can knock togehter simple fps type games without having to touch any scripts.

If you want to know the pipelines/processes involved in making a game this will give you a usefull beginners insight.

www.conitec.net/a4info.htm

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