Sign in to follow this  
shrek2

[.net] Where can I find an accredited online C# class?

Recommended Posts

I'm looking for a class that's going to give me college credit. I also prefer that the class will go over gui (basic winforms stuff, not heavy duty game programming).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Most of the online "schools" you'll find aren't very reputable. If you really want to take a class online, it would be best to go through the college you attend/are planning to attend, and see what kinds of options they have available for online programs.

If you're just in it for the learning experience, you really don't need a full-fledged class; the free tutorials you'll find will be enough to get you started.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
the problem is that most colleges don't teach c#. they'll teach java. the other problem is that they seem to have something against gui programming (winforms). it's as if it's beneath them to teach gui and they want to make it as difficult as possible.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
From what I've seen, DeVry offers the option of either C++, Java or C# for a good chunk of their language-based classes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by shrek2
the problem is that most colleges don't teach c#. they'll teach java. the other problem is that they seem to have something against gui programming (winforms). it's as if it's beneath them to teach gui and they want to make it as difficult as possible.


You're missing the entirety of the point.

Most colleges (that are worth anything) don't teach java either. They use java to teach computer science. Command line programming isn't because they're making things difficult, quite the opposite. Avoiding UI programming avoids unnecessary overhead for learning to program.

Colleges teach programming, not some technology. If they're doing it right, you should be able to pickup java and C# and C++ and what have you with little trouble.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by Telastyn
Avoiding UI programming avoids unnecessary overhead for learning to program.

I'm all for universities providing real computer science education as opposed to being java certification assembly lines, but I can't agree with this. GUI programming is most students' first and most useful exposure to inversion of control and to event-based programming. Until they've broken out of the linear execution paradigm, their understanding of that aspect of computer science is incomplete. Ease off on teaching them how to use GridBags, by all means, but avoiding UI programming altogether avoids learning.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by Sneftel
Quote:
Original post by Telastyn
Avoiding UI programming avoids unnecessary overhead for learning to program.

I'm all for universities providing real computer science education as opposed to being java certification assembly lines, but I can't agree with this. GUI programming is most students' first and most useful exposure to inversion of control and to event-based programming. Until they've broken out of the linear execution paradigm, their understanding of that aspect of computer science is incomplete. Ease off on teaching them how to use GridBags, by all means, but avoiding UI programming altogether avoids learning.
I agree. Event-based programming is an important skill to master.

However, I would disagree with the use of existing systems for teaching it, except for maybe as a first-day example. They need to write it themselves. The way I truly grokked event-based programming was writing a GUI system for a game in SDL. While I knew the principles of events, delegates, etc. in C#, the act of actually writing it taught me how to take advantage of it in appropriate situations much more effectively.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sure. I perhaps presumed overly much that we were discussing freshman level cs101/102 style courses. Traditional data structures and algorithms courses won't gain much.

UIs are of course a great tool for teaching certain program structures and getting away from iterative programming. The OP though in his reply insinuated that UI programming is better/easier (and more practical by the tone of the post). My argument that CLI programming should not be ignored/disregarded was perhaps overstated into 'avoid UI altogether'; which is indeed overly limiting.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this