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Hi, and two questions !

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Greetings fellow game makers ! This is my first post, so I am a rookie on this forum. I am part of a group who would like to develop a game on the Wiiware. Most of our gameplay mechanics, story and music are done and we are going to start developpment pretty soon. I think my partners are already registered on this website but I don't know their username yet. I'm registering for help but I also hope I can help other users. These questions might look ridiculous to you, but I must say I really am a beginner. The only games I made until now were done on RPG makers 95, 2000, 2003 and XP. Now we are making a game with unity game engine, so that's a completely different story. I'm the game designer, which mean I'm in charge of the battle system and story. I know a few things about prog, but I'm not a pro. For information, the game is a adventure game, with a few similarities with Zelda. My questions are mostly about textures and graphics. First question : Textures. I have learned how to make seemingless textures with real photos. It's a very easy way to make good graphics in my opinion, but... My question is, is this a common thing in the industry ? Are textures made with pixel art or based on real photos. For example, in Zelda : Twilight princess, do you think the textures were made with pixel art or based on photos ? Second question : Since we are making a Wiiware game, we are limited to a 50-60 mg game. How does texture's height and width eat memory comparatively to polygons ? Well, this is all for now. Thank you in advance !!

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Textures are created by artists. It is up to the art lead to decide on a feel for the game, then it is up the artists to incorperate any source material necessary to achieve that feel.

They may start with a real life image, then paint over it until it's unrecognizeable. It takes a lot of skill and coordination to produce an entire game of seamless/matching texturing.

As far as disk size, texture information is going to be one of your biggest enemies. You can use a compression format such as png.

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Depending on the type of game you're making you may not have to be too concerned about storage capacity limit. Especially for WiiWare.

Since Wii only supports up to 480p, you can get away with using smaller texture sizes than you would on PC or either 360 or PS3.

I doubt a beginner team would end up over the size limit for WiiWare. But you can probably do a quick budget on your design to see if you're well below the limit, near the limit, or well above the limit.

One thing in your post that set off the alarm bells in my head is that you guys are targetting the Wii as beginners.

1) Nintendo is not going to give beginners access to a dev-kit.
2) If they do, it costs a crapload of money, which you probably don't have.
3) I couldn't find any reference on the Unity engine website to say that it even supports (or will at some point support) the Wii platform. I could only find any indication of Windows/Mac/Linux support and upcoming iPhone support.



My only suggestion would be to make a PC game.

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Regardless of how you use the engine, as far as size constraints go, use the best raw compression methods (jpeg's save alot of space and still keep decent color quality) and implement the importation into the engine.

The thing you'll probably only have to worry about are the mip-maps if you're using those. I would suggest that for the textures that will be used most often (i.e. ground textures, buildings), if you use a bunch of tiny textures and then "sew" them together, you should save some space and make the bigger picture look more uniform than blocky. I.e. using 9 1x1 blocks together instead of a few 9x9 blocks. It should break everything up.

The other thing would probably be how well done your models are. You could most likely get away with making a high-poly model, skinning it, and then using that skin on a low-poly model to save some space since you're not working with 1080p or anything.

While you're doing things, break your models/textures up as much as possible so you can get the highest recreation values for your work. i.e. you have 20 building pieces. You could use Base A with 2 windows, or Base B with 1 window with Middle piece 4 that has a banner on it with Roof F. it'll make your buildings look more randomized and should use less space in doing so instead of creating a separate model for each building.

Luck.

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Hi, and thanks for the reply.

What you say about Nintendo is true, and that's why we are not asking for devkit until we have a demo completed (Obviously they wouldn't care about us).The problem is that the gameplay heavily relies on the wii mote controls, but it's also possible on PC.

We are all in our 20s and most of us are graduate (and work). Money isn't really a problem now, and we don't really care about profits. We want to make games because we love it. I think all we have to do is a really good demo and present it. It's worth a try.

If you have more advice, I'd be really grateful to read it.

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Quote:
Original post by Astrophysicist
First question : Textures. I have learned how to make seemingless textures with real photos. It's a very easy way to make good graphics in my opinion, but... My question is, is this a common thing in the industry ? Are textures made with pixel art or based on real photos. For example, in Zelda : Twilight princess, do you think the textures were made with pixel art or based on photos ?


If you're going for photorealism, use photos. Even if you aren't, a real scene can be a good starting point. In general, I think a very large portion of texturing is done by hand. Twilight Princess was almost entirely drawn, although I wouldn't be surprised if they touched up photos of real castles and stones.

Quote:

Second question : Since we are making a Wiiware game, we are limited to a 50-60 mg game. How does texture's height and width eat memory comparatively to polygons ?

Well, this is all for now. Thank you in advance !!


A texture takes up a little bit of memory, but it's easy to keep under control. The images themselves are typically 2nx2n in dimension (where n is usually between 8 and 10), so assuming four channels (RGBA) at one byte each, your total size in memory is 4n-4kB.

In comparison, a model is composed of triangles, which have three vertexes, which each can have 3D position and normal vectors, and 2D texture coordinates. If we assume we're using floats, this is 96 bytes/triangle (unoptimized, of course). A model with ~4k triangles can be 384 kB; to have a texture smaller than this, you would have to have 256x256.

So combined, our model with texture would take up 640 kB. This would wreck my Tandy 1000EX, but not a modern computer.

Lastly, high-five for astrophysicist solidarity!

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