Sign in to follow this  

Mathematics of the Rendering Pipeline

This topic is 3490 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

If you intended to correct an error in the post then please contact us.

Recommended Posts

Hi! I am searching a good (!) tutorial/documentation/explanation of the mathematics of the rendering pipeline. It should cover the world, view, projection matrix (and explain why they look like they look) and the viewport mapping. It would be perfect if the tutorial focus on direct3d, but its not a requirement. I have found tons of slides about the pipeline, but they are all from a high level view. They just say "this is the projection matrix, this is the view port matrix" and so on. But im interested in a in depth explanation of the maths. Thanks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The OpenGL red book has, hands down, the best description of the transformations involved in scanline rendering I've ever seen. I recommend it to all my students. Note that the full version of the explanation is only present in the 1.3 version onward.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
"Essential mathematics for games & interactive simulations" (ISBN 155860863X) also contains various in-depth chapters on the subject and it covers all kinds of other handy subjects to boot. I heartily recommend this book, if that holds any value [smile]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
"Tricks of the 3D Game Programming Gurus By Andre' LaMothe" Covers In Depth on the subject of Software Rendering on today's hardware. Cannot recommend it enough.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Check out Dave Eberly's website: Geometric Tools. The source code is free, so if you can dig through it it's a free resource. (it's pretty clean code, give it a shot...)

This book has the software details and a good description of the software rendering pipeline.

Hope that helps!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This topic is 3490 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

If you intended to correct an error in the post then please contact us.

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this