Sign in to follow this  

ping

This topic is 3487 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

If you intended to correct an error in the post then please contact us.

Recommended Posts

if in a LAN , a ping from a computer called A to a router connected between computer B and computer C fails, does it tell us something about that router: that is, can we assume that the router has something wrong with it..............

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by y2jsave
if i try to make a socket to the router and that failed, does it mean something..
please help
Yes, it means you can't connect to the router.
A router is designed to be as transparent as possible, you really can't assume anything about it at all, ever.

If you have a direct connection from a PC to a router, with nothing in between, and the router is set up to respond to ICMP pings, and you ping it and don't get a reply, all you can assume is that there's something wrong with either the wiring or the router.
Similarly, if you're on the LAN side of the router, and the router has a configuration utility on port 80, you could try to connect to that instead. But that won't tell you much more than the ping did.

What exactly are you trying to do?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by y2jsave
what are exchange routers
i tried google but cant find.
Presumably it means routers on the Internet between your PC and the destination PC.

Quote:
Original post by y2jsave
on which layer the ping command executes ?
The IP layer, I believe (Although I'm not entirely sure). It has to know about IP addresses so it knows what to ping, but it's not TCP/IP or UDP obviously.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by Evil Steve

Quote:
Original post by y2jsave
on which layer the ping command executes ?
The IP layer, I believe (Although I'm not entirely sure). It has to know about IP addresses so it knows what to ping, but it's not TCP/IP or UDP obviously.


Ping is special packet (part of ICMP), which is encapsulated in IP header. ICMP packets use IP for routing.

Some Linux network stacks use UDP packets for ping. They receive custom response from similar systems, or a usable error message from everything else.

ICMP has no proper authentication or flow control, and can lead to problems over WAN (low-level, infrastructure-assisted DoS, for example, flooding remote machines with 64k packets). UDP on the other hand can be controlled within the scope of other traffic shaping, and is more network friendly. UDP ping however is not true Ping as part of IP networking.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This topic is 3487 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

If you intended to correct an error in the post then please contact us.

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this